07.27.2015 South Amherst Dawn with Fog

Another morning to stay home and rest the back.  Later on the Mazda goes to West Springfield to have the check engine light analyzed which will probably cost a few weeks pay to fix.  I am hoping it is only a sensor and not the whole computer which has been hinted at.  I already paid the local mechanic to replace one sensor and then tell me he couldn’t fix the rest, so it’s pay twice time.

I have a few more prints to frame for hanging on Saturday at a local bank…Northampton Co-op on Rt. 9 in Amherst for anyone in the neighborhood…and maybe one or two still to print if I am not satisfied with the current selection.  I may add this or another similar from the same morning of this past June 27.

South-Amherst Sunrise-3-062715-700WebThe others from this day are here.

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About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Landscape, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

21 Responses to 07.27.2015 South Amherst Dawn with Fog

  1. When we were on our Southwest trip last fall the check engine light came on in Albuquerque, so before heading into remoter areas I stopped at the Hyundai dealer and had the light checked. Fortunately it was a false alarm and nothing was wrong with the car (except for having an electronic system that made the check engine light come on for no reason). Let’s hope your situation plays out the same way.

    Liked by 1 person

    • No false alarm here, Steve. It already cost $375 for the oxygen sensor. Hopefully that is the most of it, but I am doubting that as the dealer told me they have to do a complete analysis to diagnose the problem. The light has been turned off twice and returned so there will be pain.

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      • I’m sorry to hear that, Steve. By an unfortunate coincidence, the check engine light in our other car came on a few months ago and I also had to replace the oxygen sensor at a cost of a few hundred dollars. Not only do we both have the same name and take nature photographs, but now we’ve also both had the same car sensor problem.

        Liked by 1 person

  2. Andrew says:

    I had the same issue with my 8 year old Lexus. Warning lights were flashing and the garage gave us good news and bad. Nothing wrong with the car itself but the sensors (4 of them) needed replacing at HK$6,000 each (about US$750). We got rid of the car.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I fear that I am headed toward that same sum or higher, Andrew. In addition to the $375 mentioned above, we have just returned from dropping off the CX-7 where I have already spent $105 for it to be analyzed and inspected (not the annual safety inspection) so we are already at $500 and climbing. And, as luck would have it, the Check Engine Light went out on the way down to the dealer.

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  3. Oh, dear. My CR-V started doing that, until every 6 months or so I was spending $400-$500! So much for Honda reliability. I finally went to Car-Max and bought a new Toyota which is serving me very well. I do have a car payment now, but it is less than the surprise repair costs and I know what to expect.
    Love this photo. Say~ do you also sell your prints through your store?

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jim in IA says:

    Our check tire pressure light came on during a trip last fall. I adjusted the tires and it stayed on. Figured it was faulty or needed a computer reset. We took it to the tire shop when we returned home. He asked ‘Did you check the spare hanging on the back?’

    Duh…

    Liked by 2 people

    • One of those “DOH!” moments.

      Well, it turns out that it is the Cam Timing Actuator which also mean a new Timing Chain and $1500. I am now waiting to hear whether the repair warantee policy we bought at purchase covers this. At the time we thought it was money thrown to the winds, but maybe it will turn out to be worthwhile.

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      • Jim in IA says:

        I hope it is covered. That’s a big cost. We don’t usually buy those policies. We did get one for the HDTV that covered several issues for 5 yrs. It was worth it. Good luck.

        Liked by 1 person

      • There are hoops to be jumped through, but I am hopeful. They require documentation of maintenance which I have. They also require the engine to be dismantled and pictures to be taken to show the problem and may require inspection by a warantee representative which could add an additional 2 days to the job. I get, if covered, one day of rental. I am not sure if I could get them to pay for an additional two days if their inspection was the cause. OTOH, having to pay just the $200 deductible rather than the whole bill makes paying for a rental more palatable.

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  5. I love reading the comments. If I had “money” I’d buy this one here in a New York minute. It is the very best one out of all the ones you posted back in June.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. shoreacres says:

    Oh, timing chains. I learned about timing chains when mine broke, many years ago. The good news was that I was on the edge of a town, a nice man stopped to see what was up, and his brother-in-law owned a garage and was willing to trot down there on a Sunday morning. That’s a collection of happenstance facts that’s not easily repeated — despite the real pain of the cost (which I remember quite well) it’s far better than having to add a towing cost to the total.

    Just this week, my tire inflation light came on. Good news, again — I was only a mile away from the Discount Tire place that provides free tire checks and repairs. In less than an hour, they’d found the screw I’d picked up and had it fixed.

    I wish you had a place close to you that would give you free timing chain checks and repairs. I wonder if you could barter this wonderful photo for the labor costs? That would be a reasonable exchange in my view, but maybe not that of your mechanic.

    Liked by 1 person

    • If I were going to a local mechanic bartering might be an option providing the person was a nature photography fan. But I am dealing with a major dealership and, even if they wanted my print, they would have to do things separately for accounting.

      I am glad that things have worked out so well for you…being in the right place at an unfortunate time. There are timing chains and timing belts so I am wondering if we are talking the same thing. Belts are plastic and need to be replaced on the short side of 100,000 miles. Chains are metal and should never break and are not required replacements at any mileage which is why we bought the Mazda which comes standard with a chain. In this case the cam actuator which controls valve timing is faulty. I am not sure why the chain needs replacing but I am not a mechanic. It wasn’t necessary to do this immediately, but eventually and for sure before our trip to Maine this autumn. But we are hesitant to take it out of town for things like the Van Gogh exhibit. Speaking of that, it turns out that Mary Beth has a prior forgotten appointment, so we are going on the 10th instead of the third.

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      • shoreacres says:

        I think you’re right — it was a timing belt, not a chain. It’s been so long ago I’ve forgotten the minor details, like what broke. But I do remember the “timing” part.

        You can bet I’m babying this new car I have. (I say “new,” even though I suppose it really isn’t, with 34K miles.) I’ve had such great luck with my other Toyotas, it’s entirely possible this will be my last car. I’m not sure I’ll live long enough to chalk up another 350K miles!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Well, visit New England a few times and you might get to that magic mileage number.

        Once the mortgage is paid off, we will have to decide whether to buy a new vehicle that will hopefully be our last or just keep our two vehicles going until they fail and then buy a new one.

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