07.20.2014 Moody Bridge Oak

I set out this morning with visions of Monkey-flowers dancing in my head.  Before I headed to the spot where I often find them, I took a left turn and drove into Hadley as it was fair fogged and I have had this image in my head for a while.  I say “this image” but I am not totally sure it is quite what I visualized so I will continue to revisit this when there are other fogs.

I also had the idea that this would be a Black and White photograph but when converting it the color combination created a flat set of tones and expanding the range created more contrast than I was looking for.  A different rendering may produce what I was looking for but that will be another day. So color it is.Moody-Bridge-Maple-072014-600WebThe monkeys are on deck, waiting for their turn at bat.  Maybe they’ve got next.

 

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About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Landscape, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

24 Responses to 07.20.2014 Moody Bridge Oak

  1. Lyle Krahn says:

    I like the mood in this image. Visualizing is a funny process. On more than one occasion I have had this clear idea of what I wanted until I got it and then I wasn’t so sure anymore if that was it. Maybe it wasn’t so clear after all. Happy to hear I am not alone.

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    • Having your visualization come together is always tricky, I think. If you are fortunate enough for all the conditions to line up and your subject to be present, there is always the something special factor that needs to shine through too.

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  2. Just Rod says:

    So you had the foggiest notion and came up with this very moody landscape. I like the warm tones.

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  3. Beautiful. Love the fog effect.

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  4. I see what you mean, but I agree that color works really well with this. I like what the fog does with color, and the peaceful balance of tree and space.

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    • I wasn’t sure whether I liked the green, Melissa. It felt, at first, like the gold was enough along with the fog. But I now feel that added color helps the gold be a bit stronger in the image. If I am lucky, that green corn field will turn gold, some more fog will come in and I can put together
      another image.
      His project reminds me of Hokusai’s 36 views of Mount Fuji

      I don’t have any idea what the end is supposed to be.

      My favorite did not, apparently, make the cut for that video. http://mucholderthen.tumblr.com/post/43893510870/boy-sitting-on-a-tree-branch-playing-a-flute-in When Mary Beth and I decided to get married, we bought two Japanese Landscape scroll prints, one for each of our apartments. When we moved in together, we hung them side by side. During our long distance courtship before making the move we often sent a Caspari card of that print I linked to and, once married, we bought a copy and it hangs next to our engagement prints over the bed.

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  5. Jim in IA says:

    Reminds me of some pictures by Mark Hirsch in southwest Wisconsin. He photographed the same tree each day for a year. Here are some photographs on facebook.
    https://www.facebook.com/photosofthattree/photos_stream

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    • Hi Jim,
      I mistakenly answered you comment within my reply to Melissa up above. So if you read my response in an email, then this is repeating myself.

      His project reminds me of Hokusai’s 36 views of Mount Fuji which have inspired me to try different takes on favorite subjects….I may have mentioned that before.

      I don’t have any idea what the end is supposed to be.

      My favorite did not, apparently, make the cut for that video. http://mucholderthen.tumblr.com/post/43893510870/boy-sitting-on-a-tree-branch-playing-a-flute-in

      When Mary Beth and I decided to get married, we bought two Japanese Landscape scroll prints, one for each of our apartments. When we moved in together, we hung them side by side. During our long distance courtship before making the move we often sent a Caspari card of that print I linked to and, once married, we bought a copy and it hangs next to our engagement prints over the bed.

      Like

      • Jim in IA says:

        Of course, the boy with flute should have been included. I like your account of the scrolls and print. The two of you must have strong connections. Good.

        As to the end of the video, I liked it. I don’t know what it means, either. But the effect engaged me. I sometimes play with that type of filter as I alter photos. Impressionism is one of my favorite styles.

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      • I like impressionism too, Jim. Maybe I was just sitting too close to the screen. 🙂

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  6. Lottie Nevin says:

    I know exactly what you mean about ‘having an image in your head for awhile..’ I’ve spent all night thinking about a painting that I want to start today. I can see it clear as day, the colours, the shapes, the patchwork quilt of olive groves. But, actually making this painting, having it turn out exactly as I want it, the image in my head, I know it’s going to be a whole different ball game. And I guess it is the same for you with your photography?

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    • I think that is true for all artists in all genres, Lottie. The other day I received a comment on Facebook asking me if I was glad I wasn’t a painter. My response was that they both have their difficulties and rewards. For me, the issue is that what is in my mind’s eye may not come to fruition depending on conditions, elements in the composition that may or not be welcomed and other variables. Someone compared painting with photography in terms of composition where a painter can add what she wants to the work while a photographer tries to find ways to remove things ( I don’t mean Photoshop cloning ). That’s a rough comparison and obviously does not fit all artists, but it’s close enough.
      I hope I understood your remark and my response was appropriate. 🙂

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      • Lottie Nevin says:

        An excellent response and thank you! I think you saw some ipad drawings that I made on facebook yesterday? I’ve only recently started to use the Brushes app and am still mastering the vagaries of it. it is the unexpected that keeps us on our toes. And sure, a painter can add what they want to their work but the medium of paint is tricky (as I also find when working digitally) – painting is also a process of putting in and taking out, re-working. I think that we are both singing off the same hymn sheet here 😀

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      • Fooled me, Lottie. I didn’t realize that those were digital creations. Yes, I think we are in agreement. 🙂

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  7. Andrew says:

    Hmmm. Maple syrup colour works well, Steve. Better than monochrome unless you go for sepia. I love the effect of the mist. Top shot.

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    • Thanks, Andrew. Don’t say “maple syrup”….it’s on the forbidden list and is one of life’s great joys when I get some. Mmmmm….maple syrup and blueberry pancakes. 😎

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  8. I’m generally not a fan of converting to black and white, so this works fine for me. It’s a lovely image with its muted colors—but colors nonetheless. (The one thing I’d suggest for presentation on a white page like this is a thin black stroke around the image to keep the sky from evaporating.)

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  9. Sandra says:

    It is a very moody photo of a very tranquil scene and I’m looking forward to more of your views of it. I must admit that I have a vision in my mind of a monochrome version of this shot, more like an ancient shot with a bit of grain and a hint of blue-silver toning. And definitely a modest thin unfancy frame, I agree on this with Steve, no matter if colour or monochrome.

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