06.16.2022 Two Ponds, Two Firsts…well four really

On Monday I shot the damselfly, which was a first of that species for me.  But just before that I made an image of a Large Cranberry-Vaccinium macrocarpon flower for the first time. I had seen some of the berries last year so had an idea that I might find them.

I was actually looking for sundews but the water was high and they were submerged.

After leaving these and shooting the Bluet, I left for Moosehorn Pond on my never-ending quest for bullfrogs. I’ll share the one I found tomorrow but after that was the meeting with the Chalk-faced Corporal (another first) you saw yesterday and then this other new species, the Dot-tailed Whiteface- Leucorrhinia intacta sunning on a lily pad.

I don’t mind repeating subjects as long as I capture them in some different way when possible, but coming across several new to me species on one day is a treat.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Central Massachusetts, Closeup Photography, Flora, Insects, macro photography, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

21 Responses to 06.16.2022 Two Ponds, Two Firsts…well four really

  1. Very nice series of images Steve! Especially liked the Dot-tailed Whiteface dragonfly!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. How DO they come up with such original names…a “Dot-tailed Whiteface”.
    Congratulations on adding four new species to your roster.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Eliza Waters says:

    Dot-tailed Whiteface is new to me and it is aptly named. Great capture, I can even see the hairs on its thorax!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Eliza. That detail is a bit hard to see with the harsh light but I am glad you were able to. Some first time species’ names I know but this was entirely new to me.

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  4. Peter Klopp says:

    I like your artistic variations of the same theme, Steve!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Jet Eliot says:

    Wonderful to see this array of summer beauty, Steve. Super dot-tailed whiteface…and on a lily pad, too.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Chalk-faced Corporal and Dot-tailed Whiteface sure are descriptive names.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. shoreacres says:

    You probably know this already, but I’m proud of myself for figuring this out. I took one look at those cranberries and thought, “Those flowers resemble our Texas nightshade (Solanum triquetrum). The reflexed petals and downward hanging stamens look remarkably similar. Solanum species are buzz pollinated, and sure enough: cranberries are buzz pollinated, too. Honey bees can’t do it — it takes Bumble Bees, Sweat Bees, and Mining Bees (and perhaps others) to get the job done. If you’re in the area again, you might catch some buzz pollinating going on.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I haven’t tried capturing the process but we have plenty of buzz pollination happening right outside our door…well around the corner of the house in our row of blueberry bushes that also require that tactic. Tomatoes too. Several years ago we noticed that honey bees didn’t visit the flowers on our bushes while bumbles did. Evolution is something else!

      Liked by 1 person

  8. melissabluefineart says:

    So cool to come across new species! I love when that happens. The cranberry~ I came across the small one a few years ago at a bog here and got pretty excited. So small the flowers were I had trouble getting my camera to focus on them. And the sundew! I really struggled to get decent photos of that. Wish you were here!!!

    Liked by 1 person

    • There are so many insects to discover and even here in the yard I always come across new ones. Fortunately I don’t mind getting muddy so getting on my knees for these shots isn’t a problem. Getting back up? Well that’s something else. 😀

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      • melissabluefineart says:

        Yes, there are rewards for being willing to get down on the ground for sure. As for getting back up, I think that is really important. I make a point of getting down on the ground at least once every single day to be sure I can get back on my feet. When I hurt my knees a couple of years ago, I wasn’t sure I could but I’m glad I persisted.

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      • When I was sick in 2018 I lost a lot of my leg strength and foolish me resisted exercise so I am not nearly as strong as I once was. Note to self…start pumping iron. 🙂

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      • melissabluefineart says:

        Ugh. I follow a woman on TV who teaches Classical Stretch, Miranda Esmond-White. I have been amazed how quickly her gentle exercises have increased my strength and balance with no weights. She was a former ballet dancer and I have fun pretending I’m as graceful as she when following her movements. :). But it isn’t Ballet, it is Tai Chi that she has adapted to her research. Not everyone likes her but you might check her out.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mary Beth leads an osteoporosis exercise class and part of their routine is stretching. She has tried to get me to do some with her but I resist. Resistance can be a good exercise. 🙂

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      • melissabluefineart says:

        :). 🙂 I hear you! Some days I REALLY don’t want to do it.

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