05.07.2022 Bear’s Den Falls

During early times in the United States this spot, according to legend, was used by Native Americans to plan raids on Colonial settlers. When the water is flowing like this the sound is quite loud so being heard must have been a challenge.

This water also eventually ends up in Boston and its suburbs as it is on its way to Quabbin Reservoir. Bear’s Den is one of many properties held and managed by The Trustees of Reservations here in Massachusetts.  The hike in is short with a bit of clambering up and through some large rock formations. I think folks swim or wade in the pool on the left but since I am there before sunrise usually I’ve not seen anyone in the water and have always had the place to myself.  Note to self…you just jinxed that.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Landscape, Nature Photography, Trustees of Reservations, Western Massachusetts, Western Massachusetts Waterfalls and Cascades and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

16 Responses to 05.07.2022 Bear’s Den Falls

  1. Eliza Waters says:

    Looks beautiful… I don’t think I’ve ever been there. We stopped for a picnic at Wahconah Falls yesterday… it was in good spate and only two other people there who didn’t stay long. Nice and peaceful listening to those falls!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. I think your pre-sunrise arrival will remain highly effective at warding off any jinxes.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It is certainly very beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. shoreacres says:

    It’s a lovely site. Are the woods there a bit different than those around Quabbin, etc.? It feels like it to me. Perhaps it’s only the vertical trunks around the water that suggest that.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The woods in this area are all fairly similar. Hemlocks, maples, oaks, etc. It’s a bit more open than some parts. The water rushing over the falls is itself on the way to the Quabbin and Boston. You’ve seen these vertical lines before that are within Quabbin proper.

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  5. Dave Ply says:

    I imagine, “meet you at the third hemlock past the second oak near the river” isn’t a great signpost for a meeting spot compared to a “here I am” noise in the woods. Especially when it’s such a pretty spot.

    Liked by 1 person

    • A loud call certainly would help a seeker. Being a bit too antisocial, especially when photographing, I try for just the opposite. In the times of Native Americans I imagine that sort of direction was fairly well understood unlike today when most folks don’t know the difference between a Loblolly Pine and a Hop Hornbeam. 🙂

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  6. Todd Henson says:

    Looks like a beautiful location. When younger I wasn’t much interested in history, but these days it’s fascinating to think about and learn about all the events that might have taken place in areas we frequent.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It is and very easy to get to. I also was never interested in history of the places I visited when younger. Now that I have plenty of my own that of others is more interesting too. There certainly is plenty to learn about here in New England as there is elsewhere.

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  7. bluebrightly says:

    It may sound loud but in this photo, it looks like spilled silk. The way the water spreads out is beautiful. I hope you didn’t jinx yourself!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks! I am fairly confident that I won’t find a crowd there…unless The Trustees are leading a hike. So early in the morning only another photographer would be likely and so far not even one of those. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. Beautiful Image Steve! Love the movement of the water!

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