05.06.2022 Frog Friday…in a frog’s eye

The season has begun!  I found this cute female basking in Poor Farm Swamp while walking the rail trail last Sunday during my failed turtle search.

I continue to be impressed and babble on about the nice detail the Tamron 100-400 captures, especially with the doubler mounted to give me 800mm  The above image was cropped to 50% after applying Lightroom’s Enhance feature.  An even closer crop as a selfie shows the nice job it does.

I was a good distance away so my reflection isn’t as large as the previous one I shared. Aside from my form I liked the sky’s color reflected on the frog’s head. We’ve had so many cloudy and windy days, this bright sunny calm day was a real treat.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Amherst, Animal Behavior, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

27 Responses to 05.06.2022 Frog Friday…in a frog’s eye

  1. I found the turtle you were looking for. Speaking of which, we both showed a big eye this morning.

    Like

  2. Eliza Waters says:

    Nice start to the season! ‘Ri-deep!’

    Liked by 1 person

  3. melissabluefineart says:

    It is pretty amazing to see the gorgeous eye close up, from a distance. Here it is still cold. I did see a bullfrog crossing a road the other day, when it was a tad warmer, but since then we’ve been woefully frog free.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Tina says:

    Love the swirl of color in that handsome frog!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Jet Eliot says:

    Delightful photos Steve. I have never had the chance to ponder the shape of a frog’s iris before, and I must say it was wonderful.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Wally Jones says:

    Nice work. Impressive results with that lens.

    Hearing lots of frogs on each outing. Finding them – another story.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Wally. With the exception of bull and green frogs, I don’t find other species very easily either.

      I think we both like to watch vlogs from the same Canadian photographer?

      Like

  7. Great Frog Closeups Steve!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. shoreacres says:

    How do you know it’s a girl-frog?

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Ann Mackay says:

    That Tamron lens is excellent – as is your lovely frog portrait. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  10. bluebrightly says:

    Really, really cool, Steve, thanks! (I’m glad you mentioned enhance in LR because I haven’t tried it – will play with it now!).

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve found both Enhance and the new masking to be really great assets in processing. Hope you enjoy using them. Thanks, Lynn!

      Liked by 1 person

      • bluebrightly says:

        Now that we can select the sky/subject or invert and we can use brushes so easily I don’t feel so bad that I never mastered PS. 😉 I’ve started to use color grading more, too. Sometimes just a little warmth in the highlights, extra coolness in the shadows, etc., can really improve a photo from a gray day. But I missed enhance. Now I need to play with it to see when it makes sense to use it. Sometimes extra sharpening is NOT a good thing. 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • Oversharpening can ruin an image. When I first started with digital I had a pretty heavy hand with it and even now think I occasionally could dial it back a bit. As much as we can now do in Lightroom there are still aspects of Photoshop that LR can’t duplicate so I always end up there before considering a shot finished.

        Liked by 1 person

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