04.11.2022 Promise you’ll never let me go

Hemlock and Black Birch seem very compatible in these woods near Dean Brook. I’ve seen them joined like this in other spots nearby.

As more is learned about the ecology of forests and soil in general it is becoming more apparent that trees communicate through their roots and also through the mycelium of fungi in the ground.  I’ve seen other examples of this growth behavior. This one is in Acadia N.P.

If you’d like to learn more about the Wood Wide Web, here is a Ted Talk with Dr. Suzanne Simard who has been pivotal in the research and discovery of tree communication.

It’s brighter if you click to enlarge and really does look like they’re holding limbs.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Black and White, ecology, Intimate Landscape, Landscape, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

34 Responses to 04.11.2022 Promise you’ll never let me go

  1. krikitarts says:

    Well spotted, Steve. I’m immediately reminded of the old folk song “The Bramble and the Rose” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oyGKjPMLEYE

    Liked by 1 person

  2. “Wood wide web” is a good alliterative coinage.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. melissabluefineart says:

    I have been reading about this, but how amazing to see trees connecting above ground! I haven’t seen that here in the woods around me but the tree assemblages here don’t feel ancient, somehow. More happenstance, if you will. Like strangers in an elevator. And so I suspect the underground connections here are not as pronounced as in other places. I have seen mycelia threading their way from plant to plant above ground on the dunes at Illinois Beach State Park, where the plant association does indeed reach back through time.

    Liked by 2 people

    • What happens out of our view is indeed amazing and most often magical as well. There is an astonishing amount of life below the earth’s surface with literally millions of little critters in a small amount of soil. People have no idea, most of ’em anyway, and that is why I posted on FB that trophy lawns are ecological genocide. So is raking up fallen autumn leaves in the spring. 🙂

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      • melissabluefineart says:

        I agree so much, and sadly it isn’t a message people are ready to hear. I was just giving some favorite neighbors a gentle nudge about native plants for their yard, and I could feel them stiffen their resistance. sigh.

        Liked by 1 person

      • shoreacres says:

        “Ecological genocide” may make true believers feel good, but that kind of language isn’t useful when trying to persuade people to try a different way. ‘Genocide’ applies to people — see ‘genealogy’ or ‘genetics’ — and it bothers me to see it used this way. Just me!

        Liked by 1 person

      • I didn’t use the phrase to feel good nor am I aware of anyone else using it. A shortened word would be ecocide which can include genocide. I used it in reference to genomes, not all of which are human, and consider it appropriate for what we do to the ground and it’s inhabitants of which there are millions in a cubic yard of earth. Healthy soil has such numbers. Herbicide and insecticide treated lawns and fields do not. I’m sorry you are offended by my use of genocide in this way but I feel it’s useful in making a point.
        Now I do agree that it would put some people off but I felt most who visit here would understand where I am coming from.
        As far as what’s in the soil I recommend Life in the Soil: A Guide for Naturalists and Gardeners https://www.amazon.com/dp/B002R0DR2O/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_tai_5SMZVE02CE7DRF1V4CXV.

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      • shoreacres says:

        I’m not offended. It’s just a phrase I wouldn’t chose to use. In fact, ‘true believers’ wasn’t quite the right choice of words, either; both are loaded with connotations that can blur meaning.

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      • Well, in that case I withdraw my apology for offending and instead offer it for misinterpreting. 😀

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  4. That is a really interesting science. Another study was looking at what was happening in the canopies.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. I’m glad you saw this rather than trip on it! The world of living things is fascinating!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Eliza Waters says:

    Great catch, Steve. The Hidden Life of Trees, by Peter Wohlleben, is one of my favorite books.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Peter Klopp says:

    It is a strange coincidence that I am reading a book by the German author Peter Wohlleben entitled Das Geheime Leben der Bäume (The Secret Life of Trees). The trees communicate through a complex network of their root system and by giving off aromas to warn other trees of danger and protect each other.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Wally Jones says:

    What a fascinating post, Steve! Terrific photograph of the phenomenon.
    Now, I’ll be on the alert to see if I can spot something similar.

    My head is now filled with images of Tolkien’s “Ents” in our local swamp……

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Wow, this is remarkable. While I have heard about the wonderful communication between trees, I don’t remember ever seeing two different species hold each other’s limbs. Thank you for opening my eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. shoreacres says:

    I first heard of mycelium a couple of years ago: about the same time I learned to distinguish between dirt and soil. It’s no mistake that one of the best-regarded companies around here is named “Living Earth Technologies.” Eventually, I began to understand parasitic and hemiparasitic plants, and all of the underground magic they perform. This image is a perfect metaphor for that activity, and visually pleasing as well!

    Liked by 2 people

  11. Sam.Rappen says:

    Very interesting and revealing post – and I enjoyed the linked TED Talk. Thanks for sharing the insight!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Todd Henson says:

    It really is such a fascinating topic, the idea there are all these different species able to communicate without our noticing. I also love how some species are potentially so much larger than we realize, such as fungi and I recall recently learning about a tree species like that, where the entire grove or that part of the forest was thought to actually be one organism instead of many distinct trees. I might have learned about it from you.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Very Nice Steve! Great Image!

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Wonderful texture and B&W conversion!

    Liked by 1 person

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