11.27.2021 The End of Prescott Road

Most of the gates around the Quabbin Reservoir are old roads, many of which end at the water. Gate 16 is the extension of Prescott Road which at one time led to the now former town of Prescott, home to the Prescott Peninsula where eagles were hacked and reintroduced to the reservoir. That effort established a new population of Bald Eagles where the numbers had pretty much got down to zero due to the use of DDT.  The program started in 1982 and has been a great success as the sight of eagles year round over and on the Quabbin is very popular for visitors and an excellent asset for the environment. If you wish to learn about it, here is a link to a page with the story.  Although I have seen several I’ve not been able to photograph one of these majestic birds.  Someday!

Gate 16 is another of my favorite hikes.  One day in 2017 I walked to the end just as the sun was cresting the treeline to the east and made a few exposures of this island.

Most likely this is the result of some sand and rocks left behind during the reservoir’s construction. As almost always, I was the only one there and enjoyed the peace and solitude along with the sound of lapping water…made less evident by a long exposure.

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About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Autumn Color, Environment., Landscape, Nature Photography, Quabbin, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

35 Responses to 11.27.2021 The End of Prescott Road

  1. As the hornet nest the other day struck me as an oyster shell, a casual glance at the little promontory in today’s picture suggests a seashell of some sort.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Peter Klopp says:

    I like the other-worldly look of this photo, Steve.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Love the colours on that island! GReat find!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jet Eliot says:

    What a magnificent program they’ve been running at Quabbin Reservoir. Thanks for the link, Steve, I read every word. We are so lucky in our country that folks in the 1970s and 1980s recognized the disastrous effects of DDT on our national bird (and other birds) before it was too late. The recovery program at Quabbin is impressive and how exciting for its success. And I am sure one day you will get that bald eagle photo. Until then, how lovely to be there enjoying the scenery and snapping excellent photos like this one.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We can thank Rachel Carson for opening the eyes of s many that work was begun to undo the damage of DDT and other pesticides. Still too many are used and we often read of some new discovery of a malady or even cause of death from them. Other raptors such as hawks and owls still are threatened by the use of rodenticides.

      One day I am sure I will get some shots, Jet. Thanks and I am pleased you enjoyed seeing this little part of the reservoir.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Ann Mackay says:

    That looks so amazingly peaceful – rather the opposite of what we have here today! The blues of sky and it’s reflection in the water are glorious.

    Like

  6. Looks like a lovely, peaceful spot and that’s wonderful that the eagles are back.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s been called “The Accidental Wilderness” which isn’t quite accurate as it is managed quite a bit. Trees are thinned to allow for greater runoff into the reservoir. But there is ample wildlife. Besides the eagles, there are loons, various hawks, turkeys, and many species of ducks. Moose, deer (there is a short hunting season in December), bears, and lots of smaller mammals like raccoons, mink, weasels, foxes, coyotes, etc. Four towns were disenfranchised, causing homes to be destroyed, some moved, businesses closed, and cemeteries moved, to create the watershed, by damming several rivers and many brooks,so Boston and its surrounding communities had more water..
      So after all that information, it is a lovely spot and there are many similar around the shoreline. Many people visit for hiking and fishing is allowed in the northern part.

      Liked by 1 person

      • It sounds wonderful, so much wildlife, you are very lucky indeed to have this nearby even if it came about in such upheaval for the humans (and it’s usually the other way around). We have a protected forest near us but wildlife is limited due to all the busy roads dissecting it. Well at least there are trees.

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  7. shoreacres says:

    What a lovely spot. The island’s striations remind me of a clamshell. I read the linked article, and a couple others, but I still haven’t been able to figure out how the word ‘hack’ got applied to the process. I even went to a couple of etymology sites and couldn’t find a clue. Do you know? I found hack box, hacking, hackers, and the history of all that, but no explanation of the word.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I really like this one. 👏👏👏

    Liked by 1 person

  9. The texture and colors of the ground of the island are quite pleasing.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. krikitarts says:

    Upon first reading, I thought you might have meant “hatched,” but I see that a familiar word now has an expanded meaning, and thanks for that. Such a lovely spot; it looks enchanted and, if the lake had been a lot older, I’d have expected the little island to have been a special place very dear to the indigenous people. Perhaps it is, after all, as you attest.

    Liked by 1 person

    • They do hatch in the hack so they are connected. Sadly, it most likely as a special place to the people who lived there and had to move for the flooding of the reservoir. It has become a special place in other ways. The name comes from a chief of the Nipmuc Tribe and means many waters which is exactly what created the reservoir…many brooks and a few small rivers.

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Beautiful image Steve! Enjoyed seeing it!

    Like

  12. bluebrightly says:

    A very peaceful-looking place and wonderful news that the eagle program is working so well.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Beautiful light on that little perfect island! I like how the clouds act like leading lines, pointing inward to the island.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I can’t claim the clouds but can claim enhancing them. Thanks, digital darkroom. 🙂 There are a few little islands and sandbars scattered along the shorelines of the reservoir. Beautiful little leftovers.

      Like

  14. What an amazing photo, Steve. The scene looks incredibly serene.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Love both the layers of clouds and strata in this shot!

    Liked by 1 person

  16. Todd Henson says:

    What a fantastic location to have to yourself. I envy you that. Beautiful photograph, with those nice rings of color. And glad to hear you can see eagles year round. That’s something I love about this area, as well. Photographing them, well that’s another matter entirely. I have done it but usually they notice me and fly away just before I notice them and I’m not fast enough to catch anything more than a sight of some tail feathers in the distance. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve only had two chances to photograph an eagle and in both cases was not fast enough, having to pull over and get the camera set up. In neither case was it at the reservoir. I have seen them flying at a distance and that is treat enough.
      Thanks, Todd. I am fortunate to have a few nice locations where I can most often be the only one there, especially since I am out early.

      Like

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