10.03.021 ’twas a dark and stormy morning

On Sunday we took a walk along one of the trails that leads to Jordan Pond. It wasn’t the best day for photography with intermittent rain and wind.  Most of the shots I made that morning were of mushrooms, many of which I haven’t ID’d yet.  But this iconic view of the North and South Bubbles appealed to me with the clouds dominating the scene almost as much as the mountains.

If you would like to see a view on a nicer day click here. Just like Otter Rocks and much of the Acadia Coastline, these are both pink granite rock. Someday I’ll clamber up one of them and photograph a few boulders including Bubble Rock which is white granite.

After this we had a nice lunch then moved into our second room, having the first available for only two nights. If it’s Sunday this must be Room 180.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Black and White, Landscape, National Parks, Nature Photography and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

15 Responses to 10.03.021 ’twas a dark and stormy morning

  1. ‘Tis a pleasantly dark and monochromatic counterpart to the brighter view in your first link.
    I have a picture of Eve and me at Bubble Rock from our 2018 visit.

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  2. shoreacres says:

    Those are great clouds, well-captured. I like the contrast between the stirred up clouds and the more even texture of the mountains. As for Bubble Rock — that has to be more firmly grounded than it appears from the photo. I suspect that one day that bubble is going to burst.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It has sat there for centuries. A few people probably more than a few, have had their pictures taken while making believe they are pushing it, or maybe really pushing it, so that bubble may indeed burst if people keep on keeping on with that. I imagine that over time, even without the power of a glacier, ice buildup around its perimeter may move it incrementally and one day it could tumble.

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  3. Very nice Steve! Really like the ominous clouds!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Tina says:

    That’s a very nice photo, Steve. I like black and white photos, but I clicked on the same place, different time–wow, that’s really beautiful.Thanks for the comparison!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Tina. Well, they do say photography is all about the light so different light, different look. I’d rather have the weather in the older image but the newer one is interesting and wild weather often provides great opportunities.

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  5. Ann Mackay says:

    Those are marvellous clouds, so there were some photographic advantages to the day…glad you made such good use of it! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  6. bluebrightly says:

    Am I the only one who sees the feminine form here? 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    • Maybe on this blog but not on FB. I am too PC to mention it on my own. 😀 It was remarked upon by one woman who wanted to know why they weren’t known as “Boob Mountains”. Kind of reminiscent of the naming choice for the Tetons out west.

      Liked by 1 person

      • bluebrightly says:

        I hesitated to say something. 😉 It’s too bad that our society is so puritanical and at the same time, still very misogynistic. We have a long way to go! I like the idea of bubbles for a name, it’s more imaginative and whimsical.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Puritanical maybe, but asking someone if they want to go to Acadia and climb the boobs might be a bit awkward. 🙂 The Tetons get away with it because most people don’t know French. 🙂

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