07.18.2021 Bright Shiny Objects

Yesterday’s weevil may not have been cute and attractive but I think we can describe today’s subjects that way.

Dogbane Leaf Beetles- Chrysochus auratus are promiscuous beetles mating constantly during their lifespan. I saw several paired up like this, although in this case not quite hooked up, on the small stretch of plants where I visit them annually.

Their elytra are metallic, shiny, colorful, and often reflect their surroundings.  Here reflecting the photographer as well.

Dewy surface tension at work.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Amherst, Closeup Photography, Insect Behavior, Insects, macro photography, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

30 Responses to 07.18.2021 Bright Shiny Objects

  1. Gallivanta says:

    Amazing that this little beetle is so shiny that you can see your reflection in it.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Ann Mackay says:

    They’re spectacular! It’s amazing how pretty some tiny creatures can be – presumably they gain some benefit. (I guess that birds would be dubious about eating something shiny and metallic.)

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nice self-portrait (not the beetle, the reflection).

    Liked by 1 person

  4. That’s a great self-portrait at the end. Maybe you should enlarge the relevant part and use it as your avatar.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Great Images Steve! Enjoyed seeing them!

    Like

  6. These are beautiful creatures.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Eliza Waters says:

    They are such a pretty beetle – terrific shots, Steve, esp. that last, dewy one.

    Liked by 2 people

  8. Spectacular photography as always and great education too. I’ve been inundated with beetles mating (and devouring) roses, sunflowers, burgundy trees and shrubs this year. Your photos almost make it seem worth it.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks! These don’t cause much harm as they only eat dogbane, a relative of milkweed, and even at that don’t totally devour the plant as some other insects do. I’d be thrilled to have them share our yard.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Peter Klopp says:

    The iridescence of this beetle is incredibly beautiful, Steve. Quite in a contrast to yesterday’s beetle!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. picpholio says:

    Marvelous beetles, I love the splendid colors !

    Liked by 1 person

  11. All wonderful photos, I particularly like the last one!

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Ms. Liz says:

    These are photos to take my time over! I love the pretty colours and the polish, the self-portrait reflection, and the dew bubbles clinging to a beetle’s feet. Exquisite!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. shoreacres says:

    What gets me is that even their feet and legs iridesce. It’s an amazing sight — and attractive as can be.

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s all chitin, a very hard substance, so I would guess the coloration is complete on all the surfaces. They may not be sacred scarabs but I think they are quite special…and beautiful. Even if I don’t capture something different from previous shots, it is still a delight to see and photograph them again each year.

      Like

  14. bluebrightly says:

    And now I have to say that I am grateful for all the years you put into perfecting your technique, because it brings this amazing little being, in all its splendor, to so many appreciative people. Pure happiness.

    Liked by 1 person

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