06.17.2021 The day reflected in a snake’s eye

On my way to the car after the heron, some frogs, a turtle, and a plain nice day to be out, I stopped one more time to check Poor Farm Swamp Pond for what might be out there.  As I approached something moved and I saw this Northern Water Snake-Nerodia sipedon where it stopped just short of the pond’s edge. I noticed the reflection of the day with its blue sky and the surrounding trees in the snake’s eye and scales.

For snake-o-phobics, aka ophidiophobia or Indiana Jones one big fear, there is nothing lovely here. But the color and reflection I find attractive. These snakes are not at all aggressive although I would not poke one in the nose with a finger. Generally they will just move away if you get too close.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Amherst, Animal Behavior, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

35 Responses to 06.17.2021 The day reflected in a snake’s eye

  1. Ms. Liz says:

    The light and colourful reflections really make that shot something special!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Todd Henson says:

    That reflection certainly helps the eye sparkle. Really nice. I always enjoy finding water snakes around. Glad you found this one.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Someone earlier on the path had mentioned seeing one of these but I did not until I disturbed it in the grass. I’ve captured my share of reflections in frog’ eyes but this was the first snake with one.

      Like

  3. I took the blue to be actual coloring on the snake until I read your text and found out the blue was reflected sky.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Jim R says:

    Nice colors. How big was it? Our most recent snake encounter was about 12″ long. Known as the Brown Snake, it was fierce. Bugs and worms beware. https://youtu.be/eO-wJM1m3HI

    Liked by 1 person

    • This one is about 24″ and much larger in girth than ours. Lucky it didn’t glomp on your finger.

      Like

    • melissabluefineart says:

      Hi Jim! I enjoyed the video. I’m partial to little brown snakes. I fostered a rescue from a toxic site and because quite fond of him. One time in the field my little Westie and I came across one. He poked it with his nose, naturally, and it leapt up and bit him on the nose and held on! I still laugh at the memory. Boy, was Pete surprised to have a snake dangling from his nose!

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      • Jim R says:

        That would be a big surprise! Those little snakes are always fun to find. They most often appear on the paved trails in the fall. They like the warmth of the concrete, I guess.

        Like

      • melissabluefineart says:

        Yes, they do. I remember one spring we’d had a burn near the dunes at Illinois Beach State park, so the ground was black. It was a warm sunny day and the ground was covered in basking brown snakes. What a sight that was.

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Peter Klopp says:

    Great capture of this dark-skinned snake, Steve! We have many snakes in our Arrow Lakes area. Fortunately, none of them are poisonous. So need to be afraid of them.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I have no fear of snakes, and generally find them interesting and handsome, although water snakes are down the list a bit, not my blue-eyed boy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve never seen one of our more dangerous snakes so all those I have come across have been a happy experience. I do show them the respect their fangs deserve. I’ve made a few closeups of this species in the past but the reflection was a first.

      Like

  7. The sparkly blue adds a lot of attraction to this snake.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. shoreacres says:

    I see more water snakes than any other kind, which is fine by me. We have several species, and they’re generally pretty shy. Well, except for the Cottonmouths, which would be perfectly happy to swim out to your boat and say hello. I didn’t realize that a snake’s scales could be so reflective; you’ve really captured that well.

    Liked by 1 person

    • This snake is also kind of shy. They often sun themselves on the asphalt of the rail trail or at the edge on the dirt but most often are gone if they see you approaching. I guess this one felt it was concealed enough with the branches and leaves and me at a god distance. I bet the cottonmouth isn’t one you would reach out and tickle. Generally the scales are not that reflective but we had rain earlier and it was still moist.

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  9. Gallivanta says:

    Impressive reflections.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I think it’s lovely, Steve! Great find, and a lovely photo. Those colours are really quite something!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. melissabluefineart says:

    Remarkable image, Steve. I hadn’t realized they could be reflective either. One I saw at the bog one day was lounging on vegetation in the water. When it saw me it merely stuck its head under water, too lazy to swim away. Clearly, if he couldn’t see me he was invisible, right?

    Liked by 1 person

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