12.06.2020 It’s a love/hate thing….

the relationship that I have with winter. I’ve never been a fan of cold weather.  Don’t like snow removal.  Don’t like having to bundle up in bulky clothing. Don’t like my moustache coated with frozen nose drippings.  Don’t like the feeling of Raynaud’s. Hate wind chill. My balance is no longer what it once was so don’t like walking on ice. I guess I’ve made my point.  🙂

I do love photographing ice as some of you already know. And there is just one weather condition that affords that opportunity so out into the cold I will go. We did not have as much snow fall yesterday as predicted, just an inch or two here but other locations had more.  I’ve been told of a nice brook feeding the Quabbin that I hope to visit but I don’t like going into the woods on a gusty day and we have some strong winds this morning.  Bad enough I have to wear blaze orange (yes it’s Sunday and hunting is not permitted but, you know, people’s freedoms) and wearing a hard hat is more than I am willing to do. I took one off the melon a few years ago and that was one time too many and does explain me a bit. 🙂  We’ll see how bad it is.

Anyway, enough of my whining. (Aren’t you glad that you don’t have to live with me…poor Mary Beth 🙂 )  One of the phenomena I enjoy most when photographing ice is the prism effect found in nice clear sculptures.

This was on New Year’s Day of 2011 and the temperature was several degrees below zero F.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Abstract, Closeup Photography, Ice, Intimate Landscape, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

26 Responses to 12.06.2020 It’s a love/hate thing….

  1. Your picture is prettily prismatic. I had to look up Reynaud’s syndrome.

    Liked by 2 people

    • Raynaud’s is something I’ve been dealing with for a while now and have mentioned before. The cold and lack of circulation isn’t nearly as painful as the thawing out. Like fingers in a tightening vise.

      Like

  2. Fantastic shot.
    A lot of folks in the north have ambivalent feelings about this time of year. I guess a lot of us come around to “if life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” Of course, lemon trees, like so many nice things, can’t survive in this climate, but at least we have some ice to put in the pitcher.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Ann Mackay says:

    I’m no fan of winter cold either, though it’s not bad here. But the photography is a great compensation – especially this lovely image.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Nice Steve! Love the spots of color in the ice!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. You left out the short, dark days! I don’t miss New England winters at all since we moved to SC. But I also don’t get to photograph lovely things like ice and new fallen snow.

    This is a very nice capture of the ice prism, Steve, so much for the eye to follow.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, short days are a bit taxing on the old psyche. Especially when the clock falls back it is a little depressing to have it become dark so soon after getting home from work.

      Glad you like the ice, Ellen. Thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Littlesundog says:

    That’s one gorgeous ice image! I do not miss the bitter cold of my birth state, Nebraska. Winter is much more tolerable in Oklahoma. I have learned to appreciate the cold for the benefits that the chill hours bring in nature. We had a hard freeze the other night, and when i went out to feed the fawns, they all had a thick layer of frost on their backs! Wouldn’t it be nice to be so well insulated?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Lori! I think Nebraska winters are probably very tough with those wide open spaces and nothing to break the chilly winds. Aside from ice, my only other appreciation of winter is how it makes Spring’s return so wonderful. 🙂 I know that the deep freeze we receive is so important for the cycle of so many lives but I wouldn’t mind the season being a bit shorter.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Those prisms are awesome. I have photographed ice close-up and with a macro lens but have never encountered that. Ice close-ups can have so many looks and patterns. I want to look for some this winter. We usually have snow covering our ice lakes so the best place might be along a stream.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I spent much of last winter making ice abstracts, Denise. Even from one day to the next their shapes can change and offer so much to enjoy and create with. The vast majority of my images are made over moving water.Sometimes after a melt and refreeze there are nice patterns on a lake or pond too.
      Here’s another made the same day. It is amazing how these shapes are created by moving water.

      Like

  8. So glad you survived the trek to share this very interesting photo with us. As for me, I’d say I have grown into an ok/hate mode of winter…it wouldn’t bother me not to see snow again…not even for Christmas. I’ve absolutely loved the unseasonably warm autumn we’ve been blessed with this year — makes for many more enjoyable outdoor days when normally we’d be bundled and chilled as you describe. And just think, winter is not even officially here yet! 🙂 May the snow and ice never arrive!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It’s a little different here where if we don’t get snow in the winter then there isn’t much if any snow melt in spring and then our brooks dry up too soon for water use and, of course, water in motion photography. But…when what you might consider a chilly day comes along we are out in our t’s and shorts enjoying a balmy January day. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  9. shoreacres says:

    It’s always a treat to find prismatic effects in the clouds, but I’ve certainly never seen them in ice. Your ice photos generally are compelling, but — well, you know me and color. Having it added to ice is unexpected, beautiful, and worthy of second, third, fourth looks. I’ll bet I could look at your winter photos longer than you can whine!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am sure you could because really I don’t whine that much. I do my share of complaining though but most often roll with the punches. However, as with this post, there are some days when I can whine like the wind. I am glad that you enjoy the winter photographs because there should be plenty to share any day now. And if not, well there are always repeats.

      Like

  10. bluebrightly says:

    It’s not whining, it’s describing your life. 🙂 I totally get resenting the inconveniences of winter on the one hand and being entranced by its particular beauties enough to venture out on the other hand. And I’ve started to be more aware of windy days, too, since we’ve had some intense ones lately that brought lots of trees down. I don’t want to be out on a lonely trail, felled by a falling tree, yeesh. And some of my favorite places have poor, if any, connectivity. But back in 2011 you did go, and the reward was great, and it will happen again. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, but yes, I was whining. 🙂 I don’t often allow myself that as it doesn’t really make things any better but once in a while a good one feels great. 🙂

      It only takes once and my once was a lucky smallish branch rather than a big lunker. It’s funny, I never used to worry about such things until I read about Nancy Newhall being killed by a falling tree while rafting with her husband. Then my own bonk cemented the fear. 🙂

      I think our weather is generally turning more fierce as the climate changes. Lately we have been having a large number of gusty days with the occasional damaging straight line wind event. Wind makes photography tough enough without having to dodge trees.

      You can rest assured that I’ll be out there at the first opportunity making ice abstracts. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • bluebrightly says:

        Like you, we’re not in hurricane country and we rarely get tornadoes so you think climate-determined weather changes aren’t affecting you. Then there’s a big storm, and another, and another and you start to think gee, it’s happening here, too. I haven’t even lived here long but I feel like I’m perceiving a different set of circumstances. Maybe one or two people will be moved enough by your photos or mine to do a little more to preserve this earth. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • That is one of my hopes in sharing images. I think the majority of our blog visitors, and my “friends” on FB, are of like minds so don’t think I am making as much of a difference as I would like. While some Covid deniers might be starting to see the light I don’t think many climate change deniers are, sadly.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bluebrightly says:

        I’m sure you’re right. We preach to the choir but maybe, maybe there’s a difference being made. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  11. krikitarts says:

    I’ll join the chorus and add that I also don’t think I’ve ever seen prismatic effects like this in ice, except on frosty windows. Both the main feature and the one in your answer to Denise are remarkable. The latter reminds me of finely-crafted silver on a necklace.

    Liked by 1 person

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