11.24.2020 Mumble, mumble, mumble

Lousy night of sleep worrying about stuff that I shouldn’t be worrying about. Decided to work on an old image to calm my brain and try again.

I am sure I have posted a similar image a while back but this is a different frame and processed with newer tools and skills.  Hope you like it. I had rented a Zeiss 18mm lens.  The starburst is sharper by a bit than with the Canon 16-35 but I opted for the latter with its versatility.

Now back to bed with Bentley. He never has trouble sleeping.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Landscape, Nature Photography, Quabbin, Sunrise, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

41 Responses to 11.24.2020 Mumble, mumble, mumble

  1. Ms. Liz says:

    I like it very much Steve! Hope you get a decent snooze ..ZZzzzz… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. krikitarts says:

    I hate it when the thoughts start tumbling about, especially when they have to do with stuff that we can’t do much about anyway–especially at the particular time when we just need to shut them down so we can sleep. And, unfortunately, it seems to be happening with more frequency. Maybe it’s a sign of increasing intelligence with our increasing maturity?

    Liked by 1 person

  3. That is such a beautiful and magical moment captured so very finely, Steve. I have nights and a brain like that, so good thing you got up and worked on this wonderful image to share with us! I hope you got some decent sleep in the end.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. margaret21 says:

    Well, if that stunning image doesn’t sooth your battered brain, nothing will.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Dogs can teach us a lot. Hope the photo and/or Bentley gave you some good rest. I have trouble sleeping too, tossing/turning all night about things over which I have no control. Not having my beloved border collie Bess anymore doesn’t help. I’m ready to get another dog I think but with covid and distancing restrictions that joy is nixed for now. At least the weather has been mild so I can still enjoy working outdoors. Your photos are so beautiful, I wonder what one would look like when your brain is not calm… 🙂 probably still mesmerizing.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Probably like a Jackson Pollack. 🙂 Not having a dog would make things a lot harder for us. Although Bentley tries us at times that is a tiny consideration compared to all he gives. Where we live distancing with him on his leash isn’t difficult but frustrating for Bentley as he loves people and wants to greet everyone up close and personal. Most of what keeps me awake is within my control but I can’t do anything about it right them so that’s the difficult part. I don’t lie awake thinking about serious issues very often. I know I can’t do anything about those.

      Liked by 1 person

      • A great reminder, Steve, of how dogs do bring us so much joy. Do I vaguely recall your other dog passed a few years ago before you got Bentley? It hadn’t occurred to me that dogs would need to practice physical distancing also. Presumably, that’s even harder for them than us as they must not understand this new behavior at all.

        And considering the beauty in all of your other work, a Jackson Pollack photo might be quite interesting.

        Warm wishes to you and yours for the holiday. I am sure Bentley is on the top of your gratitude list. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, we lost Murphy in June of 2015 and waited about a year before adopting Bentley. There were two prior beagles as well, Cassie and Dixie. Losing Murphy seemed like it came close to killing me emotionally. I am not sure how I will react to losing Bentley and wonder if at my age adopting another will be a good idea. Of course, Bentley might survive me at my age. 🙂
        I don’t know if dogs spread Covid, there have been a couple of incidents I think, but some people are concerned about it spreading through touch of fur so we keep our distance. The virus is somewhat confusing as there are continuing example of surprise sources.
        And for a follow up…the two things keeping me awake both worked out satisfactorily. One of the bits of lyrics from a favorite performer’s song is “most of what we worry about never happens in the end”. Just goes to show the waste of worrying.
        Thanks, (fill your name in here). 🙂 Best wishes to you and those close to you for a Happy and safe Thanksgiving.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yes, I understand what you mean about the intense emotions of loss (I lost over a dozen close friends, business associates and my only sibling all in the same year as Bess.) I wanted to honor her before having another dog. Now, a year and a half later, I’m ready emotionally (it would be a joyous reprieve from current events) but with the physical distancing I’m not so sure. All in all, I suppose the right dog will appear at the right time.

        True, much of what we “worry” about never comes to pass. All the more reason to stay in the moment and I’d presume the beauty of your photography does just that. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • That it does…especially the water experiences which drown out all the world’s noise, both inner and outer.
        That’s a lot of lost people, especially your sibling, and probably the worst year of your life.

        Liked by 1 person

      • You are fortunate to live in an area with so much natural beauty.

        As far as the losses, yes, it was one of the worst year’s of my life although it seems to have expanded into 2020. I’d like to think this year will be the end of it but… a day at a time…

        Liked by 1 person

      • 2020 has been the worst in our lifetimes. The Great Depression was terrible but fortunately in our past…at least for now. Hopefully 2020 will be in our past soon and next year will bring better times for us all.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’d like to think that and while optimism is always good, I’m probably better off taking it one day at a time. Still, I think of my parents growing up during the Great Depression and then the Holocaust…perhaps 2020 is our generation’s time for sorrow and great challenges as well.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Sadly, I think there is a pattern in human experience throughout the ages and no doubt in our future that there are eras like those you mention. Hopefully our nation and the world will eventually manage this pandemic so that the economies and all else in life can return to sustainable. I’d like to think the folks who make decisions will be able to guide us through recovery without the widespread poverty experienced during the Great Depression and whatever wars there are will be of the cyber variety. As far as another holocaust goes, it seems that there are societies that are not capable of solving their problems without scapegoating and wreaking death upon their adopted enemies as a perceived solution.
        Although I am not an adherent of any religion, I always liked Baba Ram Dass’ advice to “Be here now”. Another way of saying one day at a time.

        Liked by 1 person

      • 🙂 Yes, and it’s critical what we envision and keep in our thoughts and hearts. “The gift is as great as the pain,” and “It’s always dark before the dawn,” are sentiments that carry me through challenging times. Stay well. Peace to you and loved ones.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Littlesundog says:

    I understand the sleep issue is quite common lately. It’s affected me too. So I just get up and work on the computer. Your image is lovely. I especially like those gentle ripples in the water. I can almost hear the lapping of water to the rocks.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I do the same, Lori. It is catching up with me though. Several days in a row are hard to make up. Napping with Bentley in my recliner when I get home from work helps.

      Thanks! I did several versions of this at varying exposures. I preferred the ripples also as opposed to smoothness.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m sorry for your sleeplessness but not for your picture.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Stones, water, soft light…all so calming. A good image to induce restfulness, hope it worked. Where was this taken?

    Liked by 1 person

    • I should make a recording when I am there to listen to when I can’t sleep. 🙂 This was at the end of one of the many roads that lead into the Quabbin Reservoir in Massachusetts. Back in the 1930’s Boston was looking for a new and reliable water source for its growing needs. Engineers found the valley and the state dammed the Swift River, displacing many families and ending the existence of four towns, which had many tributary brooks, several of which have appeared here over the years. Thanks, Sel!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Beautiful image Steve! Does Bently ever go on your photo outings?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Reed. No he doesn’t. Most of the time I visit the Quabbin Reservoir and watershed where dogs are not allowed. But he’s a beagle and there is no way I would let him loose in the woods and he is too active on his leash for me to hold onto him and make photographs.

      Like

      • shoreacres says:

        Earlier this morning, I was listening to some old-timers talk about the days when dogs were used for deer hunts in east Texas. Your comment about not letting Bentley off leash brought that discussion to mind. Apparently when those old-time hunters released their hounds, they really would take off, and the guys would be getting calls for a couple of days from towns far removed from the woods, with people saying, “Hey, man. One of your dogs showed up.”

        Liked by 1 person

      • Yup. Hounds are trackers and their noses take them wherever the scent went. I know beagles can be trained to a degree but they are well known for their single mindedness and for that reason we do our best to keep them controlled at all times.In Bentley’s case the same would be true for seeing a person on the other side of the street and wanting to greet them. He wouldn’t look both ways first

        Dogs are not allowed in the Quabbin and its watershed within the various gates. I was photographing snow once when a hunter came along looking for his beagle. I am sure the DCR folks wouldn’t have been pleased to see the dog chasing deer or any other critter. No idea if he ever found his hound..

        Like

  10. Eliza Waters says:

    Nice one, Steve. I like the play of ripples around, and the orange glow reflected on, the rocks in the foreground. Beautiful sunrise!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Val says:

    You and me, both, worrying about stuff. This is a great photo, very calming.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. shoreacres says:

    I especially like the interplay of ripples around the rocks. They look almost like nature was attempting a Venn diagram.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Ann Mackay says:

    Beautiful and very calming – it would be a great as a print for a room that could be an especially serene space. Maybe we all need something like that as a refuge when our minds won’t stop whirring… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • It would be nice to have an ‘escape’ room. The woods do it for me most of the year but as someone who has problems with the cold that isn’t always the place so a room would be ideal…or a greenhouse/orangery. 🙂 Thanks, Ann!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. melissabluefineart says:

    I love this. I had a night like that myself last night, and this is the perfect image to calm my heart.

    Liked by 1 person

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