08.24.2020 Macro Monday-Spidah and Grasshoppah

The 180 came back last week and this weekend was my first time out with it.  Saturday was a big disappointment.  Pretty much every image was not very good as a result of everything coated with so much dew that crisp detail was impossible although I didn’t recognize it at the time and not until I could review the images in LR. At first I thought the lens was not focusing properly and would have to return it to Canon.  But yesterday, even though it was dewy the images were as I expected and that came as a relief.

At first, as I walked through the grass, ferns, and brush, in the Lawrence Swamp wet meadow, tiny grasshoppers were jumping ahead of me but were all landing on the ground below the plants where I couldn’t shoot them…probably would have continued fleeing anyway.  But I noticed a bit of yellow atop a stunted blueberry shrub…everything gets brush cut down in the autumn so the meadow does not change to forest…and found this Goldenrod Crab Spider-Misumena vatia  amidst the dew drops on a leaf.

As I watched it became more mobile and crawled about the leaf until settling below for a candid face on shot.

As I was getting the above shot a Red-legged Grasshopper- Melanoplus femurrubrum  landed on a small oak and I moved on to that. This one did not want to have its picture taken, I guess, because it kept scuttling around the stem to be opposite me. I ended up holding the cable release to its full extent and walking around to the opposite side which caused it to move into full view of the camera and a side portrait.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Amherst, Closeup Photography, Insects, macro photography, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

30 Responses to 08.24.2020 Macro Monday-Spidah and Grasshoppah

  1. krikitarts says:

    Crab spiders are long-time friends of mine from the wildflowers that grow around our cabin, and I appreciate how small they are and how challenging it is to get good macros with their eyes in good focus, and I’m particularly fond or your second image. The grasshopper came out very well too, thanks to your dodge-and-switch tactic.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t see very many yellow crabs, I can only recall one other image. Mostly I see the white with plain or red markings on the abdomen and I think they are a bit larger. But maybe they just were better fed.Thanks. The grasshopper definitely put me through my paces.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Judging from these pictures, we can say you dew good work.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Rest images. Steve! Glad you got your 180 back!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. shoreacres says:

    The dewdrop on the spider’s leg is a real plus. I’ve never seen one that color, either. It’s quite attractive.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The rearmost drop seems sharper and I am wondering the the one on the middle leg is doubled. Yellow is a great color for most things in nature and spiders can use all the attractiveness help they can get to be appreciated.

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Mike Powell says:

    Glad to see you got the 180 back, Steve. Hopefully the repair did not cost an arm and a leg. I love crab spiders, though I rarely see them. That may be because they are so small and often are well camouflaged or because I don’t hang out in the right habitats often enough. I like your trick with the grasshopper–I have played hide-and-seek with many of them and it can be a little frustrating trying to get one to cooperate.

    Liked by 1 person

    • About $560, Mike. Pretty reasonable as a new one would have cost ballpark $1300. I haven’t quite figured out if it is the same although it is providing sharp images. Something feels different but that could just be in my head where there is a lot of room for stuff.

      At first I would go to the other side to get it where I wanted but once I returned it did too. Then I figured out the cable release trick. I prefer a cable release over timer just because you cannot predict movement which is true of a flower also when there is a breeze and you are waiting for it to lapse.

      Like

      • Mike Powell says:

        That’s not too bad. The only experience I have had with the Canon repair folks was for my Canon 100mm macro. My repairs were not as expensive, but my damage was internal and the lens is a whole lot cheaper to begin with. Were you using a physical cable release or an electronic one? I remember using the physical kind that screwed into the top of my SLR back when I was shooting film. You make some good points about cable release versus timer. For a landscape it probably doesn’t make a difference, but for a close-up subject, it could matter. Have you tried remotely controlling your camera from your phone?

        Liked by 1 person

      • I haven’t tried or even considered using the phone as a shutter release. I do have a wireless remote but don’t use that either. I’ve always liked the cable so use it except for when I am chasing bugs with the flash unit.

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      • Mike Powell says:

        I know that there is a Canon app that will let you control your newer cameras from you phone, including viewing what the camera is seeing, adjusting settings, and engaging the shutter, but I must confess that I too have never used it (and rarely use the Live VIew mode when using the camera directly–I prefer using the viewfinder).

        Liked by 1 person

      • LiveView mode would be difficult when chasing dragonflies. But for flowers and other somewhat stationary subjects I find it invaluable for assessing sharpness and composition. In a way it is like looking through the old ground glass of a view camera, except that it is right side up, and allows a better chance to judge what is included in the frame. I’m generally stuck in my ways so doubt I will ever use the Canon app…but then I originally told a classical music club (BMG) that I was never going to switch to CD’s. 🙂

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      • Mike Powell says:

        We learn and we adapt, but I think that for the most part you and I are similar in liking to stick with the old ways of doing things.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Remarkable images, everyone. My favorite is the second one, with the dew drop on the spider’s leg. A real winner. And thank you for the cable release trick. I shall use it.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Eliza Waters says:

    Great portraits and smart of you to outfox the ‘grasshoppah.’ 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Adele Brand says:

    Crab spiders are fun. Nice pose with the dewdrops.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Super photos with so much fine detail! Glad you got your 180 back!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Todd Henson says:

    Nice! I especially like the 2nd shot of the spider, under the leaf. I think it’s the more diffused light I’m liking, and the drops on its legs.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Ann Mackay says:

    Beautifully detailed images! I’m glad to see that the 180 is back on top form and I loved your sneaky trick with the grasshopper. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

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