08.08.2020 Glinda the good mosquito

Not exactly a good witch but not a bad mosquito either.  Elephant mosquitoes-Toxorhynchites rutilus don’t pursue blood meals but sip flower nectar such as that of this Boneset Thoroughwort-Eupatorium perfoliatum.

Although it looks to be in danger, the Leather Bug aka Scentless Plant Bug-Harmostes fraterculus is really in no jeopardy. The flash in this case really highlights the metallic nature of the mosquito’s exoskeleton. Nice feathery antennae as well.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Closeup Photography, Insect Behavior, Insects, macro photography, Nature Photography and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

34 Responses to 08.08.2020 Glinda the good mosquito

  1. krikitarts says:

    An elephant mosquito–who knew? I wonder if, as the occasion arises, they also sip nectar from trumpet vines.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. What extraordinary blue shines on this insect! Great photo, Steve, capturing 2 insects going about their business.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I got really excited when this mosquito showed up on the flowers, Pete.So beautiful and interesting. I had never seen one before although I did have another similar larger one several years ago…a Gallnipper-Psorophora ciliata which does feed on blood and also is a disease vector. I shot one in my backyard several years ago and one of its offspring may have given me West Nile Encephalitis a few years ago. Thankfully the Elephant is not a worry.

      Liked by 1 person

  3. As its name implies, is this critter as huge as it appears? It looks more like jewelry than an insect.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes it is, Bob. I mentioned above that I have seen a larger one in the yard but this is probably as big dimension-wise as a daddy longlegs. That iridescence really caught my attention and the flash enhanced it some.

      Like

  4. You did a good job capturing those feathery antennae, and of course in finding a non-blood-seeking mosquito.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Todd Henson says:

    One thing I like about this is the reminder not all mosquitos are what we think. I certainly had no idea this one existed, so I’ve been educated today. Thanks much for that.

    Liked by 1 person

    • True of so much, Todd. The fear of the unknown or different is a problem between humans and the “other”. My neighbor kills every insect that enters his yard…or at least attempts to. Despite knowing its benign nature, being a mosquito does trouble me a bit.

      Like

  6. Maria says:

    Now tell me this is that 180mm macro length in action. Did you use the 2x? What aperture?

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Great image Steve! Never knew this mosquito existed! Really cool image of an interesting mosquito!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Eliza Waters says:

    I see these every once in a while… but I never get as close as your camera does! Great shot. 🙂

    Like

  9. shoreacres says:

    I had no idea. I assumed all mosquitoes were blood-suckers, even if not disease vectors. Live and learn, for sure.

    Like

    • Same here, Linda. I was happy to learn about this one and, as Todd mentioned above, we shouldn’t assume the worst without knowing. Think of all the harmless insects swatted for no good reason.Otoh, until learning about this one, I assumed I had a good reason for swatting mosquitoes.

      Liked by 1 person

  10. What beauties—the mosquito and your photo.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. What an education! I hadn’t realized there are “good” mosquitoes too but, then again, why should I be surprised? Thanks for sharing the information and great photo.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We as humans often regrettably place all things in one basket. I suffered a mosquito borne disease a shot while back and until this discovery assumed all were bad too. I stand corrected. When in a discussion about what good similar pests possess someone suggested furthering of survival of the fittest. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • I vaguely recall you being very ill but thought it was Lyme Disease. Hopefully, you have recovered 100% and certainly are more knowledgeable from the experience. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • It was West Nile Virus Encephalitis and it appears I am fully recovered. My doctor told me it would take a year to become normal which I replied that it would be a new experience. 🙂
        It is relatively rare although each year the number of cases increases. When it first hit the USA in @1999 there were a number of fatalities in NYC. The good news is that history has shown one to be immune after surviving.That antibody thing we hear about lately. Because it was rare it took a week to get the diagnosis back after multiple tests were negative. The spinal tap provided the information. Now here in MA we have to be concerned with another mosquito gift…Eastern Equine Encephalitis. You can believe I slather up with repellent. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thank God you recovered and it hasn’t precluded you from your treks in nature and taking those stunning photos! Lessons learned.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks. It would take going beyond “near fatality” to keep me from spending time in nature. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  12. bluebrightly says:

    Interesting, Steve, I certainly wasn’t aware that mosquitoes might have that kind of metallic sheen. Your boneset brings you lots of goodies!

    Liked by 1 person

  13. melissabluefineart says:

    Neat! I’m learning a lot about insects here. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • So am I. There’s a whole world of insects out there to learn about and that’s true for entomologists as well with all that are yet to be discovered and named.

      Like

      • melissabluefineart says:

        You’ve reminded me of an odd dream I had last night, in which my favorite entomologist was teaching my daughter analytical math. It was poignant, because he had a severe stroke a number of years ago, while she has fairly severe learning disabilities. Two brilliant minds trapped behind barriers.

        Liked by 1 person

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