07.21.2020 Moosehorn Pond Dragonfly

I haven’t seen many dragonflies this year but admittedly I haven’t looked very hard either.  Shame on me. Even this past Sunday morning, after the pink water-lily, I was looking for bullfrogs,which I found, and saw the motion of this Autumn Meadowhawk-Sympetrum vicinum ♀ (fka Yellow-legged Meadowhawk) to my side.  Once again, the 100-400 made it easier to capture this from a non-threatening distance and the dragonfly stayed stationary long enough for me to make a few images before it flew off.

It is on some bedstraw although which I don’t know as I was more interested in the critter than the perch

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Animal Behavior, Closeup Photography, Insect Behavior, Insects, Nature Photography and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

18 Responses to 07.21.2020 Moosehorn Pond Dragonfly

  1. Mike Powell says:

    Beautiful shot, Steve. Are you using the newer version of the 100-400mm lens. I seem to recall that it has a much closer minimum focusing distance than the older version, which helps in situations like this.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I have the newer version, the EF 100-400mm f/4.5-5.6L IS II USM, which Canon says can focus as close as 3.2 ft.

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    • I am shooting with the Tamron, Mike. With the reduced income of semi-retirement, in my case, comes reduced spending and the thousand dollar different convinced me of the Tamrons worth. Surprisingly it has not disappointed. At one point a few years back I did own the first push-pull Canon 100-400. Aside from the inconvenience of the zoom movement, it was rather soft. The newer is much sharper from my observation of posted images and reviews. I was probably about 6 feet away for this image.

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      • Mike Powell says:

        I totally forgot that Tamron had a 100-400mm. I have way too many lenses, but it seems that the two that I use most often are Tamrons–my 180mm macro and my 150-600 telephoto zoom. As for your comment about “semi-retirement,” I transitioned from “semi-” to complete retirement last year.

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      • Complete is my goal, but for now partial is required. When the car is paid off we’ll see. My more immediate goal is to get down to three days.

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      • Mike Powell says:

        I started my glide path towards retirement a good ways out and transitioned to a three day schedule during my last six years of work. Most importantly, my schedule had me working on Tues, Wed, and Thurs, so all weekends became four day weekends. That allowed me to gain some real separation psychologically from work and some time to develop other interests, which just happened to be photography.

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  2. It’s beautiful Steve. I know we have dragonflies and damselflies in my are of New Jersey but I don’t often seen them.

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  3. Nice details. I assume the early hour made the subject more docile than it would be later.

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    • For this time your assuming did not do what the oft used phrase sometimes suggests. Cooler morning temperatures do create torpor in many insects giving the photographer an advantage.

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  4. shoreacres says:

    Are the wings as blue as they appear in the photo, or is that reflection from the sky? It’s certainly a pretty thing.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. krikitarts says:

    A really lovely shot Steve, a pretty thing indeed.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Nice Steve! Dragonflies are fun photo subjects! Especially when you can fill the frame😊

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