07.20.2020-2 Pink Reflection on Moosehorn Pond

Sunday morning I set out on a mission. I don’t always leave with a preconceived notion of what I am looking for but sometimes I do and this time I did.  I’ve had pretty good luck over the years with water-lilies in general and the pink variant of the White Water-lily-Nymphaea odorata…aka Fragrant Water-lily in particular while visiting Moosehorn Pond.

I Shot this with my Tamron 100-400 macro ( 🙂 ) and the 2.0 extender +CP at 704mm, f/13, 1/4 sec, ISO 100.  The macro joke goes back a ways also while shooting water-lilies.  I was with my buddy Mark, who does mostly wildlife (his speciality is moose), and I had waded into Harvard Pond with my 180 on a tripod.  We both got the almost exact same shot.  I was in the water with leeches and he was sitting above on the guard rail with his 600 macro.  🙂  Yes, I was wearing boots but had I stepped in a little too deep…

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
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24 Responses to 07.20.2020-2 Pink Reflection on Moosehorn Pond

  1. Ha. Should have saved this one for April 1…I read it twice before I saw the smiley-face and read all the way to the bottom of the paragraph (a new interpretation of “macro” for sure). Love the shot of the lilly. Flower looks suspended in mid-air.

    Liked by 1 person

    • The suspended look is something I go for whenever I find dark water. It’s a nice effect that, I hope, sets the image apart from others. Sometimes I think I try too hard to be clever. Glad it worked this time around.

      Like

  2. Eliza Waters says:

    Wonderful effect, Steve. Heavenly!

    Liked by 1 person

  3. A lovely levitating lily. 😊

    Liked by 2 people

  4. The dark background works well.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Mike Powell says:

    Lovely color and reflection, Steve. I really like the composition with the blurred lily pads leading us to the waterlily and then veering off the right, completing a gentle S-curve.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Ann Mackay says:

    The waterlily glows against the dark background – spectacular! Love the arrangement of lily pads too.

    Like

  7. shoreacres says:

    It’s interesting that I’ve never found a pink Nymphaea odorata. They really are beautiful — it’s interesting that the pinks vary as they do. I remember more pastel pinks from your previous posts, but this is almost cotton-candy pink.

    Liked by 1 person

    • There must be some explanation for them being regional, if they are. The white water-lily is much more numerous and the pinks somewhat rare. I have always been able to find one or two here but once in a while they aren’t present…maybe giving it a rest for a year. The hues do vary. Some are entirely pink and others, like this, a mix of pink and white.

      Liked by 1 person

  8. So artfully and skillfully accomplished, Steve. The light is perfect and beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Very nice Steve! Reminds me of my pond at my old house😊

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Todd Henson says:

    Yeah, I do love those LONG macros! 🙂 Beautiful shot, nicely composed. And it’s interesting how the two reflections almost form a V shaped cup the lily sits in.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. bluebrightly says:

    The slightly out-of-focus lily pads in the foreground are perfect as a lead in to the perfectly quiet refelction – you put them there, right? 😉

    Like

    • Ha, ha! No I did not wade out and arrange the pads. 🙂 I thought about stacking for a sharp throughout image but decided I liked the softer foreground too. Thanks, Lynn.

      Like

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