07.09.2020 GBH on a Duck Box

Before I went to the meadow on July 5 (Strangalepta Flower Longhorn Beetle and Grass Pink), I took a look at North Quabbin but in the dim light and not very inspiring fog (it’s not always great) left and drove down to Quabbin Park, it wasn’t opened yet, then decided to go to the swamp. Driving by the beaver pond on Route 9 I noticed a great blue heron out in the middle on one of the wood duck boxes. I put the Tamron 2x extender on the Tamron 400 and hid behind some cattails and made this shot between a few of them.

A funny thing I noticed about the Tamron 2.0 extender…on the Tamron 400 it does double the length so this was at 800mm.  On my Canon 180 macro  the metadata says the length was 252mm. When I purchased it the write up said it would only work on the Tamron but I figured that was just for autofocus so tried it on the macro.  Obviously it worked for the Appalachian Brown but there must be something about the way it physically deals with  the Canon that doesn’t double the 180.  Anyway, I just purchased a Canon 2.0x, not here quite yet, at a good price used so next time the 180 will be doubled.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Animal Behavior, Nature Photography, Quabbin, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

28 Responses to 07.09.2020 GBH on a Duck Box

  1. Your GBH initialism in the title, followed by a quick glance at the picture, made me think George Bernard Heron (rather than Shaw).

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Always great to get Great Blue in a different style. Nice. We have tried a few extenders for wildlife over the years. Have Tamron / Canon. Once in a while we use the Canon 1.4x on a Canon 100-400 but the day needs to be perfect. Just something to have in the kit when needed, it’s not all that large.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Littlesundog says:

    We see blue heron in the slough and also in the old river channel a good bit. I once found a dead one laying in our pasture, which looked as if it had just fallen from the sky. I was able to get a closer look at the great stature of this bird, and investigate the feathers, which were quite beautiful and interesting – especially at the neck.

    There is much to love about this image. The swamp water, wood box, and heron feathers tie together nicely!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Lori. The light wasn’t the best, but as you mention, suited this particular shot. I’ve never been very close to one, maybe 50 feet at the closest, but appreciate the beauty of the feathers through the lens and of course when enlarging while processing.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. melissabluefineart says:

    New toys are just the best, aren’t they? The anticipation….George Bernard Heron looks very noble there on his perch.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Nice image Steve! Strange with the Tamron 2x teleconverter. I would think the image actually is Doubled and is 360mm because of the optics in the teleconverter. But the metadata is off, maybe because of the contacts between the lens & teleconverter being different brands. Maybe different amount of contacts between the 2 – lens & teleconverter? When you get the 2x Canon teleconverter, try shooting both and see if the images are similar in size. I use quite a few teleconverters with different brands and have never seen that!😊

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Reed. I was planning on comparing the two for sharpness and light transmission so will be able to check the magnification then. I guessed the incompatibility would be autofocus communication but there could be other things lacking. In the whole scheme of things it’s not too important as long as the image quality is there.

      Like

  6. Todd Henson says:

    I never tire of these beautiful birds. Thanks for sharing this one. And I agree with Reed, it seems most likely it really is doubling the focal length but the metadata is off. I’ve heard of other instances when third party lenses or teleconverters didn’t integrate perfectly when it came to electronics, though the optics might be just fine. It would be interesting, though, to compare images from the Tamron and Canon converters, as Reed suggests.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t either, Todd. Until now, they were about the only birds, along with egrets, that were big enough for me to get decently framed shots. Now with the current setup smaller birds are possible too. I will be testing both for a few qualities and will post my findings.

      Like

  7. I have yet to go down the extender route, but from your photo it looks like a good one to go down.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve had extenders since my film days. The 1.4 always worked well which s why I still have it. The original 2.0 was soft and especially so with the 300 f/4. I think having one for doing macro work is just as useful as wildlife, not that insects aren’t wildlife, especially for situation like the butterfly I previously posted. Extra reach is always an asset…especially at the dinner table. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  8. shoreacres says:

    After all this talk of extenders, I went looking, and it seems that none of them are compatible with the Canon 70-300. Canon says so, and even the people who’ve tried to rig something up say not to do it, for various reasons. Or, they say, “You can do it this way, but only if you never go beyond 250mm, lest you damage your lens.” That’s enough caution for me. Phooey.

    I was as intrigued by the duck box as the heron. I’m used to seeing bluebird boxes, but we’re a little short on wood ducks, so that’s a new one. It certainly made a fine perch for a handsome heron.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Maybe some day a nice vintage yacht owner will pull up to your workdock and hire you for a complete refurbish inside and out and you can get yourself a nice 100-400. 🙂
      They are quite large for bird boxes. Quite a few local wetlands have them but I have yet to see one occupied. Bad timing on my part. I’d love to watch the little nestlings do their leap of faith.

      Liked by 1 person

      • shoreacres says:

        More than a few times, humans have had to help baby mallards make that leap of faith. Mallards adore setting up nests on boats, especially in coils of rope or cockpit pockets. When it comes time for the ducklings to head for the water, they often can’t jump over the caprails, so we have to help them along. There’s no missing the need for assistance when the time comes. Between the frantic quacking of the mother on the water and the peeping of the babies, it can be heard two docks over, and people come running.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Not that a jump from a boat isn’t scary for any duckling, but this is a bit scarier. I cannot imagine doing that at any age. There are other videos where they do land in water but I’ve always liked watching them bounce in the leaves. ❤

        Liked by 1 person

      • shoreacres says:

        You reminded me of this video of a red-tailed hawk’s accidental flight. It starts about 5:42 — watch the reaction of the siblings!

        Like

      • “Hey…where’d George go?” Those talons are not very helpful on a metal roof.

        Like

      • shoreacres says:

        I’d never priced the 100-400. I just did. Yikes!If I were sure the Rapture or Armageddon was around the corner, I might put it on a credit card and shoot away, but I think rationality needs to prevail just now!

        Liked by 1 person

      • 🙂 Notice that I have the Tamron. When I had my antique restoration business there could have been a job lucrative enough to finance that but yeah, the impending rapture might need be in the offing.

        Liked by 1 person

  9. Minna says:

    So handsome bird, like a statue! Great weekend and happy shooting 😊

    Liked by 1 person

  10. krikitarts says:

    If birds had beards in lieu of long neck feathers, from the seemingly-sceptical look on this one’s face, one might think he’s saying, “Not by the heron my chinny-chin-chin.”

    Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s