07.03.2020 Frog Friday-Hey Bullfrog!

Female Bullfrog two ways.

I started a bit farther away and slowly crawled closer until I filled the frame with the 180.  Females have tympanums (the round ear drum behind the eye) smaller or about the same size as the eye  and a white throat.

Once I had this I moved a bit lower and forward and saw that there was a reflection that I liked.

I eliminated the polarizer effect which made the reflection a bit more visible.

The male has a much larger tympanum and the throat is yellow.

This is another with the 100-400 +2.0 extension tube that got some nice froggy detail.

If I am not back with a -2 post, I hope everyone has a great, safe, and enjoyable 4th of July weekend.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Animal Behavior, Closeup Photography, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

44 Responses to 07.03.2020 Frog Friday-Hey Bullfrog!

  1. Hannah Keene says:

    Oh these are absolutely WONDERFUL, Steve!! How long have you been doing photography, if I may ask?

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    • Thanks, Hannah! 40+ years. Doesn’t seem that long in a way and then a long time in another. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

      • Hannah Keene says:

        Well that explains why I have a lot of catching up to do 😂 I took a hiatus of 40+ years!!

        Liked by 1 person

      • For a few of those years I did also. I started an antique restoration business which took up a lot of my time while still maintaining my day job. So just occasional forays for a year before I regained my sanity. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hannah Keene says:

        My goodness, did you get any sleep??? One’s own business generally takes 60+ hours a week. That plus a day job of 40 hours……..

        Liked by 1 person

      • Not much, Hannah. Of course that was a while back and I was younger and more durable. I don’t get much more sleep now but the stress is reduced. I worked in my shop in the early morning, did my 8 hours at the day job, then worked in the shop before bed. I totally lost touch with photography until we went to Acadia each year, then would always want to come home a day early because I felt pressured knowing I had other folks furniture sitting in my shop….and we hated leaving our dog in the kennel. Eventually I got back into photography and dropped the business after a few sessions with a sanity counselor. 🙂 I had left the day job for a year (1993) because Mary Beth was working as a Legal Services attorney and making enough money so we didn’t need my income. I had just about got things to a point where I was bringing in what I made at the day job, less of course my expenses, when her MS caused her to stop work. Fortunately I had maintained good relations with the day job employer and she had me come back. But that led to me stopping the business after talking with the psychiatrist. I turned the finishing shop into my computer/photography room and now, at 72, am only working 28 hours a week and having more time for us and photography. Probably a bit more than you expected when asking about sleep. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Hannah Keene says:

        Not a bit more than I wanted at all, Steve. I apologize for the delay in replying – I wanted to reply with more than a formulaic response, and my exhaustion due to medical issues has been problematic of late. I’m so sorry that Mary Beth has MS. I’m sure it is extremely difficult for both of you. Fred needed a lot of care the last five years of his life due to legal blindness, mobility issues, and lots of falls and then some broken bones. It was very hard for both of us. He continued to work because we needed the medical insurance due to my immune deficiency, and the Affordable Care Act wasn’t in existence. I had worked until I landed in the hospital twice and the doctors told me I had to retire. When I turned 65 and qualified for Medicare, he was able to retire. We do what we do because we love our spouses (and we loved our jobs), and we do the best we can with the hand that we are dealt. You and I are almost the same age – I turn 69 at the end of this month – so I imagine that you and your wife, as well and my husband and I, were raised by parents who served in WW II. In Fred’s and my case, our fathers were in the service over the long term, so we grew up amidst men who had survived the war. We certainly absorbed the ethos that when things get hard, you just buckle down, do what needs to be done and get through it with as much grit and grace as you can. I only returned to photography after Fred died. I found that I had begun to notice beautiful things as I walked the dog and wanted to record them. I had been away from it for 50 years and have never had consistent formal training. But I found that it was excellent solace for my grief, and it is something that gives me intense joy. Now I am working like crazy to learn as much as I can as fast as I can precisely because of that joy. 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mary Beth is a marvel. Despite the MS, she is very healthy, active, and has quite a positive attitude. She has met each challenge with a determination that it won’t slow her down and for the most part none of them has…not even me. 🙂
        I am glad that you returned to photography and that it has brought you not just relief from grief but a bit of joy at what nature’s beauty has to offer. As far as learning, even seasoned professional photographers continue to learn. Don’t let mistakes get you down, they are excellent teachers. And keep enjoying it for the joy of it. Speaking of the joy…one of the first books I read as I first started learning about photography was a small book by Freeman Patterson. If you haven’t come across his books they are worth looking at. This one was my first of his series but they are all inspiring..

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  2. krikitarts says:

    Hope you have a fab froggy fourth!

    Like

  3. shoreacres says:

    The second photo’s especially appealing because of the reflection. For some reason, it never had occurred to me that male/female color differences would appear in frogs, too. That fellow with the yellow throat is quite spiffy.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I was surprised when I learned that also, Linda. I guess that qualifies in the animal kingdom for the males to be a bit spiffier quite often. My tendency was to make full use of the polarizer as in the first image, but when focusing I turned the polarizer also and saw the reflection get stronger. I knew the polarizer can reduce a reflection but was surprised how strongly it popped with the turn.

      Like

  4. The reflection in the second image makes the picture. At the same time, the frog’s head is duller than in the first view. Was this a different frog. or was the duller head a consequence of the polarizer?

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Terrific shots, it’s good to see these creatures looking bright and healthy. And I agree with Linda, that yellow throat gives that fella a very dashing look, like a cravat, what what?

    Liked by 1 person

  6. melissabluefineart says:

    Very fine Friday Frogs! What a fabulous way to start my day~thanks!!!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Littlesundog says:

    Well, you certainly have appealed to my “froggy” side this morning! These images are just outstanding!!

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Fabulous frogs flashing their finery. A fantastic fourth to you, friend.

    Liked by 2 people

  9. NJUrbanForest says:

    Great shots!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. Wonderful captures, Steve. I love the reflections and how the feet are visible through that clear water. Nice!

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Your photos are ribbeting, Steve. Thank you for explaining the difference between males and females, I had no idea. 🐸

    Liked by 2 people

  12. Jane Lurie says:

    Oh my, Steve, these are wonderful! The details is incredible in these image. Fun to view.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Ann Mackay says:

    Wonderfully detailed frog portraits! The reflection is a lovely touch – makes that photograph really stand out. Reckon you must have all the local frogs hoping that you’ll come along to take their picture… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  14. That’s a real beauty, Steve. Love that green which almost looks metallic.

    Liked by 1 person

  15. Minna says:

    Spectacular frog photos!

    Like

  16. Nuno França says:

    Wonderful, wonderful!
    I love the details of the shot! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

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