06.11.2020 Dennis Moore’s Favorite Flower

Monty Python reference. Skit below.

A few years ago in a Facebook group post of mine, I met some folks nearby who had their own patch of Sundial Lupines-Lupinus perennis. Every year since at about this time  I have made a point to go over and photograph them.  They are New England’s only native Lupine.  Most of what you might see along roadsides and in internet posts, such as these at  Acadia N.P., are native to the western part of the U.S. although their numbers are greater here than our natives. All the varieties seen in nurseries and finding their way to gardens are the non-natives. Sundials are fairly rare in the Northeast and threatened currently.

I liked the bit of sunlight hitting this one so it is the first to be posted. There may be others.

Here’s the skit if you have a few minute for some Python zaniness.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Closeup Photography, Flora, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts, Wildflowers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

39 Responses to 06.11.2020 Dennis Moore’s Favorite Flower

  1. krikitarts says:

    Wow, what fun with the Monty crew–I’d not seen that before. Your post was also my first introduction to these lupines; we probably have seen only the non-native variety in MN, but we’re still happy to see them. Thanks for this!

    Liked by 1 person

    • This map shows them in MN so you could see them if you get lucky.
      I’ve seen most of the Python sketches but every once in a while find a new one.

      Liked by 1 person

      • krikitarts says:

        We’ve had a wildflower mix planted along the access road to our cabin after the road was paved several years ago and there are lupines among them. I’m pretty sure they are the perennis variety, and will now remember to have a closer look when we’re back there and they’re blooming. I’ll email you a couple of photos from 2018 (and maybe Steve S too) to get your opinion(s), if you’ll be so kind.

        Like

      • When do you think you will be back there, aside from being allowed back in the U.S.? I’d think that, coming from NZ with the virus all but eradicated, you wouldn’t have a hard time.

        Like

      • krikitarts says:

        It’s not concern about being allowed back in the US, but rather about being allowed back in NZ after having been in the US. We hope (and should be able) to get our permanent NZ resident visas (it’s been a 5-year process) in about a month, and we’re pretty confident that will greatly increase our chances of being allowed back in.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I am sure there may be reasons lately that some countries don’t want American visitors beyond Covid-19.

        Like

  2. eremophila says:

    Any time is a good time for Python! I’ll never be able to look at a lupin the same again! Great shot Steve👍

    Liked by 1 person

  3. It’s surprising how few naturalists wear tiaras nowadays, I wonder why that fell out of favor.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. As we drove into Maine two years ago I began seeing lots of great-looking lupines along the highway. I figured they couldn’t be native, and so I passed them by. Now you’ve confirmed my intuition back then.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Ah, the magical lupine. Did not know they grew in New England. We have lupinus havardii, which grows to a height of over 3 feet. Do you get the solid white albino strain?
    Thanks for starting my morning with Monty. We need more twisted minds.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I haven’t seen any all white lupines, Bob. Some of these have white petals at the top that become blue with maturity.
      Yes, especially these days the nuttier the humor the better.

      Like

  6. melissabluefineart says:

    I was just enjoying the lupines at Illinois Beach State Park. Parts of the woodlands are managed for them and they are doing very well. You never see them elsewhere, here. I just love the shades of blue and purple you get on every one. So much prettier than the cultivars and western species, in my opinion.
    Loved the skit!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I think so too, Melissa. And in these I like the way the leaflets are arranged which I guess is the sundial part.
      Glad you liked my choice of humor for the day. Maybe I’ll try to share more of it. 🙂

      Like

      • melissabluefineart says:

        By all means~we need some levity 🙂
        I did wonder why they are called sundials. I’ll have to go back and look again. I always love how the leaflets collect dew.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. blooper0223 says:

    Monty Python is the reason I often burst out laughing at the most innocuous things, and why so many people back away from the crazy lady. I didn’t have to watch the video because as soon as I see the name Dennis Moore, with or without lupines, I start singing the song.

    I’ve got some lupines, y’all.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Great image Steve!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Eliza Waters says:

    It’s a beauty – I love the striations on the lower petals.

    Like

  10. I have always loved Lupins. My Dad grew a whole border full of them when I was a lad. Lovely photo, Steve.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. shoreacres says:

    One glance at the leaves and I was thinking ‘bluebonnets.’ Of course our state flower’s also a lupine, so that makes sense. We have several species, so the legislature declared each one a state flower, including the one that Bob mentioned.

    One interesting feature of our bluebonnets is that the white banner turns maroon-ish as the plant ages, and the amount of pollen in each flower declines. It’s a fascinating system; bees are less attracted to the maroon than to the white, so their pollen collection can be more efficient. It looks like the same color change might be happening with this plant, too.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am not sure if the same thing happens. I’ve only visited these in the spring when they are fairly fresh. I’ll have to do another visit later on or ask the owner about that.
      Nature creates amazing systems to be as efficient as possible…not much goes to waste.

      Liked by 1 person

  12. bluebrightly says:

    It’s interesting to learn about the eastern lupine…I haven’t even heard of it, let alone have I ever seen it. Washington has a number of lupines but most are on the other side of the mountains. It’s really nice that you make the annual lupine visit; the photograph is perfection. That flower is so elegant with the violet banner and all that detail on the wings (I had to look up my lupine parts – couldn’t remember them). 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  13. It’s been soooo many years since I’ve seen that sketch! Nearly wet myself all over again. Cheers for that, Steve! Fine frame, by the way! 😁

    Liked by 1 person

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