06.01.2020-2 Back to our original programming.

Sometimes at 4 a.m. when I review the news overnight the world seems a bleak place.  Thus this morning’s post.  After accepting the day and enjoying the warmth of the sun things of course seem brighter. Generally I prefer to keep politics out of the blog but sometimes it’s hard to follow that. For anyone put off by the earlier post, I apologize.

One of our front yard spiderworts.  Virginia or Ohio I have never figured out, but it is more white than the usual blue, that I know. We didn’t plant it, it just showed up several years ago and has been quite fruitful multiplying. I’d prefer it to be Ohio so it could be considered native but probably should get out the magnifier and do some closer inspection.

Shot with the 100 macro for a change.  Had to hold it steady in our afternoon breeze and the plamp was too short to use the 180 for the composition I wanted.  I think the 100 might have felt under appreciated so was happy to get a little exercise.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Closeup Photography, Flora, Nature Photography and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

35 Responses to 06.01.2020-2 Back to our original programming.

  1. Beautiful twin blossoms and very nice capture!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It’s good to see a white spiderwort again. I haven’t found one in a long time.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Todd Henson says:

    Very nice, and for it be in the front yard, easily appreciated, fantastic! Photos like this certainly do help remind us there’s still something of beauty out there.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Once I convinced Mary Beth not to yank them, they are a bit aggressive, we now enjoy many in a few places both in the front and back.Once they start flowering they just keep going for a while as you can see from the buds hanging below. It’s nice to have such reliable flowers around, both for enjoyment and photography. Thanks, Todd.

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  4. That’s lovely. I haven’t seen these, and don’t have an idea of scale – – what would you estimate as the diameter of a blossom? Thank you.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. These are beautiful.

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  6. That is a beauty, Steve! Even better when they just show up like that! A very lovely portrait. And I do hope things calm down out there soon.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We have a few things that just appeared here some of which we enjoy and others we don’t seem to be able to rid the yard of. Our neighborhood is a former farm so many of the plants that grew wild back then show up on their own. Thanks, Pete.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. bluebrightly says:

    Gather seeds and sell them! 😉 Seriously, I love that. The all-blue Spiderworts are nice too. I used to go back and forth about them but I finally decided I really like them, mainly for the blue. But this shows more of the flower structure, and I like it. Beautiful photo, too!

    Liked by 1 person

    • I had a hard time convincing Mary Beth that they were worth putting up with their aggressive nature. But they are beautiful and trying to eradicate them is a tough task because it only takes a few remaining root hairs for a new colony to spring up.Better to enjoy thier beauty. Plus the attract hover flies. 🙂 Yes, the reproductive organs do stand out better when the petals are a lighter color. Thanks, Lynn!

      Liked by 1 person

      • bluebrightly says:

        One of my friends in Germany is a passionate advocate for the insect world. She lives in a city but manages to attract an amazing variety of life to her balcony. She has helped me remember that we need to think twice before destroying plants – they might be important – they often ARE important, to some insects.
        https://naturaufdembalkon.wordpress.com/
        I guess you don’t read German – neither do I – but just look at the front page of her blog and you’ll get an idea. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • If people care enough they do find a way to make things happen. I know of another blogger who has difficulty leaving her home but has a balcony garden that offers her a lot of nature up close. I browse with Google Chrome so it automatically translates for me each time I land on another language. Once I tell it to do one, in this case German, it does from then on with every visit to that site.
        I agree on the importance of preserving plants, but in gardening that has to be a measured action.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bluebrightly says:

        I didn’t know Chrome did that – I have a translator that requires a few clicks and as easy as it is, it’s still cumbersome. Thanks for mentioning that, and here’s to a little more balance in nature. 🙂

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      • There was a tool, Google Translate, that only did a few words or phrase at a time that you had to type in. It may still be out there, but this translates the entire site while you are there and remembers your choice for future visits. Set it and forget it. 🙂

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  8. Mike Powell says:

    Gorgeous shot, Steve. I too have a 100mm macro that does not get much love. Recently I have been using my 60mm macro in situations when the 180mm is too long. I love these white spiderworts, which really show of the the blue and yellow of the stamens and the other parts (plant anatomy is not a strong suit for me).

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Mike. It’s rare that I can’t back up for the 180’s length…you don’t hear complaints about glass being too long all that often…but it’s good to have options. I already carry so many different lenses that the bag is getting oppressive. That other part is the pistil and the top of it the stigma. The tops of the stamens are anthers. I bet you’ll remember the stigma because that is the same name for the patches on dragonfly wings…well pterostigma. 🙂

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  9. Eliza Waters says:

    Pretty! Not sure I’ve ever seen a white one.

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  10. shoreacres says:

    I do like spiderworts. I came across some pure white ones in a vacant lot this spring, but these are just as interesting, because of that touch of purple. One of these days I’ll get a photo of mine posted, and we can compare. It’s funny that both of us should have found white ones.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. krikitarts says:

    Beautiful pair of doubles (is that redundant? I don’t think so, in this context). I met my first spiderwort in western North Carolina a decade or so ago and it was love at first sight.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. Dave Ply says:

    Nice flower, I’m not familiar with that one. My 105mm macro is probably the least dusty of my lenses, although they’re all getting a bit dusty these days.

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Lovely! I have the blue variety. My (now deceased) Mom brought them to me years ago and still remind me of her love of gardening too. I couldn’t agree more with your comment above. Current events do make the world seem bleak but getting outdoors in the garden and sun are a balm for the spirit. So are the beautiful photos you share, Steve. Thank you for putting some love and beauty into the world which is needed more than ever right now.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I am glad the images bring a bit of happiness. I also have the blue, I think these are just white morphs, but don’t find them as appealing for some reason. I also like that they attract hoverflies so enjoy them for that as well. Thanks!

      Liked by 1 person

  14. I have seen fields, glorious fields, of spiderworts, and never once seen a white one. Just look at the pretty blue stamens (if that is what they are. Not pistils, I don’t think). I really like this image.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, those are all stamens, so nice and feathery. You can see the single pistil with the slight slim curve on each flower. I’ve never seen a field of them although if we allowed they might take over our yards as they are quite prolific. Possibly you see the Ohio Spiderwort where we have the Virginia Spiderwort. Thanks, Melissa.

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