05.28.2020 Viola pedata

A favorite among violets, Bird-foot Violet is recognized by the leaves which give the plant its name. The flower itself is easily recognized as well.

The color varies from a bluer shade to this, more purple, and something that says “violet”. Of course, if it was ultraviolet we couldn’t see it.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Closeup Photography, Flora, macro photography, Nature Photography, Quabbin, Wildflowers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

29 Responses to 05.28.2020 Viola pedata

  1. Mike Powell says:

    What a real beauty, Steve, and a lovely composition.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Maybe an enterprising horticulturalist will go beyond existing violets to create an “ultra violet” cultivar that we can see.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Wonderful find, well shown.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Beautiful image Steve! Enjoyed seeing it!

    Liked by 1 person

  5. krikitarts says:

    Yet another one that’s new to me. These are so arresting; how fortunate to just find them without even having to hike and climb and wade!

    Liked by 1 person

    • The grouping was definitely the lazy photographer’s friend, Gary. I did eventually climb up the hill across from where I found these and there were hundreds as well. It was breezy up there so I didn’t shoot any of those. Glad to make the introduction.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Eliza Waters says:

    Lovely! I saw a bi-color last weekend in someone’s garden. Upper three petals were lavender and the bottom two were deep purple. Stunning!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Gallivanta says:

    These are beautiful. Are they sweet -scented like other violas?

    Liked by 1 person

  8. The colors are beautiful, Steve.

    Like

  9. Todd Henson says:

    These really are beautiful flowers, and full of color. Nicely portrayed.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. shoreacres says:

    If Ultra Violet still were alive, we surely could see her! The lines you mentioned are called nectar guides; there’s a nice article about them here.

    This certainly is a pretty flower. Do you know the so-called bird’s foot trefoil (Lotus corniculatus)? It’s an introduced species and doesn’t grow down here, but it’s in your area, and I suspect like this one received its common name because of the leaves.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks for the link, Linda. Sort of what I was describing with the pink lady’s slippers as tarmac markers.

      I haven’t seen Bird’s foot Trefoil but do know that it is found throughout most of New England and can be quite pesty. According to GoBotany the name comes from the arrangement of the seed pods.

      Like

  11. Ann Mackay says:

    Those are so pretty and delicate. We don’t get that variety here (as far as I know), but they’d be very welcome.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. bluebrightly says:

    So pleasing, Steve…this is one of the flowers that I remember my mother talking about. 🙂 She loved Spring ephemerals.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I only discovered these a few years ago. Mostly I was familiar with the common bluies that grow everywhere, including our lawn. I stumbled upon one plant while walking at Harvard Pond and fell in love with their shape and coloration. The leaves are appealing as well. I grew a couple in a barrell planter in the backyard that flowered this year but they are so much better in the wild.

      Like

      • bluebrightly says:

        That all makes sense. It’s nice that you can grow them, but what a joy it is finding them. I’ve got a few native things growing here but we’re renting and the owners are mowing freaks so I have to be very careful where I plant. I think it’s a losing battle, and I just need to stick to containers, but you’ve had success with them, right? It takes time to figure out what works. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Mine are in a container…a barrel I got at Home Depot. But I will probably transplant them into the woods this autumn. Planting things in rentals is always risky if the landlord doesn’t want your treasured plants dug up and taken away.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bluebrightly says:

        Here, it’s more a matter of ingrained habits. They’re really, really nice people but they’re used to running the mower over the whole property in a certain way, as they’ve been doing for years, so, watch out if you’re in the way! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

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