05.11.2020 Large-flowered Trillium

Still no sign of my yellow lady’s slipper but the White Trillium-Trillium grandiflorum is back and beautiful. The leaves are a little damaged, from a frost while still tightly curled I think, but the flower is looking good.

Last year I shared a very similar shot but in black and white. I like the background here so kept the color.

I’ve given up hope for the lady’s slipper and probably will not try any others. I buy them from a local native plant farm and they come, I am sure, with the necessary microorganisms required and I treated the soil for the proper pH but they just don’t do well in my little woods. At $50 a pop I’ll accept defeat.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Closeup Photography, Flora, macro photography, Nature Photography, Wildflowers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

45 Responses to 05.11.2020 Large-flowered Trillium

  1. krikitarts says:

    That flower is looking great!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Nice Steve! Looks Great!

    Like

  3. Littlesundog says:

    Goodness!! Too bad you couldn’t see my jaw drop when you mentioned the price tag! That white trillium is gorgeous. Even with a little frost damage, it emerged big and beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yeah, it is jaw-dropping. And I tried more than once. 😦 Part of the price is supporting the New England Wildflower Society which now goes by the Name of Native PLant Trust. But raing lady’s slippers is a challenge and that’s figures in also. I may try another year but giving the bank account a break for 2020. 🙂
      Thanks, Lori. I was concerned the flower wouldn’t open properly but it succeeded and its partner may also.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Ah, that really beats the ice. A beauty.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Bob. It does. We didn’t reach the lows that were predicted but it has been chilly in the morning. I am very happy to wait until December to start shooting ice again.

      Like

  5. $50! yikes. It seems like a record year for trillium, I may post a couple of snaps, just to show how profuse they are this year. and despite the snow on them!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I’ll go for the Trillium any day. And this is a very nice one. Will there be more?

    Liked by 1 person

  7. When you show new trillium pictures, spring has finally come to Massachusetts.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Leya says:

    Trillium flowers are beauties – sorry about the lady’s slipper though. Worth a try!

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Eliza Waters says:

    Such a lovely trinity! Our woods only have the red version, and I’ve never seen the white or pink around here. Years ago, I bought a yellow trillium with mottled leaves. It is still alive, but it hasn’t increased at all. I’ve got to figure out what more it needs.
    I’m with you on native orchids – simply too fussy and expensive. I’ll leave growing them to the experts.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I was encouraged when I had the flower bloom last year so hoped that maybe I had a species that would last in my little woods. Seems not but I know that they sometimes go on hiatus for a year so can hope. In my comment to michael above I linked to Junior’s bloom last Spring.
      A friend on FB posted a shot of a trillium mixed with both yellow and red on the petals. It’s most likely past now a week later but I’ll keep it in mind for next year.
      Like I am sure you do, I know of quite a few spots for pink and white lady’s slippers and we both know where to find a few yellows.I may be wrong about the whites. Didn’t we talk about me showing you some white lady’s slippers?

      Like

      • Eliza Waters says:

        I don’t recall if you shared it with me, but my memory isn’t what it used to be! I’ve seen some pinks in Ashfield and Shelburne. They go fast, so you have to time it right. I guess that is why they call them spring ephemerals! 😉

        Liked by 1 person

      • I don’t think we knew each other then and there is no comment or like from you for that post. I was alluding to some at High Ledges that you might have seen. I may post an “In Requiem” later on if mine doesn’t return and, of course, if I photograph any this year there will be a post.

        Like

      • Eliza Waters says:

        That is the site I was thinking of, too. Unfortunately, there are many ticks there these days, grrr. One needs good armor!

        Like

      • Unless you have a cat, which I don’t think you do, you might want to treat an outfit with Permethrin. It works. I do not get ticks on me when wearing treated clothes. You’ll still need Deet or Picaridin for your skin.
        Some years High Ledge’s yellows don’t produce as many flowers as other years but that is true for most lady’s slippers…preaching to the choir, I know. 🙂 I’d guess 10 days from now would be the time for them.

        Like

      • Eliza Waters says:

        We do have a cat, so we must watch out to protect her. We tuck clothes and spray Deet, but if we aren’t vigilant, as you know, they manage to find a way in.
        I’ll have to plan a trip to HL by the end of the month.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I’ve read some reports about its effect on cats so I would forego the Permethrin then.

        Like

  10. Beauutifully captured, Steve.

    Liked by 1 person

  11. Todd Henson says:

    The color is great for showing off that yellow, too. Sorry to hear about the lady’s slipper. But at least you tried.

    Liked by 1 person

  12. shoreacres says:

    I always enjoy seeing your trilliums (and lady’s slippers). Despite the damage to the leaves you mentioned, I wouldn’t have noticed it. Or, if I did, it wouldn’t have been distracting. Things may be different in your woods, but I rarely find a plant that hasn’t been at least slightly nibbled or otherwise affected by growing conditions. Sometimes I think too much perfection can be distracting, too!

    Liked by 1 person

    • My first reaction is to find something pristine as an example of the beauty that is the flower…or butterfly/moth etc. Yes there is damage to much that’s out there. Everyone’s gotta eat. But there is something to be appreciated in the natural chaos we witness while out in the field. I am about to post one other such image.

      Like

  13. Ann Mackay says:

    Very beautiful – I miss seeing them in Edinburgh’s Royal Botanic Gardens. (Used to spend many happy hours there!)

    Liked by 1 person

  14. Dave Ply says:

    Trillium are always nice. I still get started how far behind us you are for Spring. My White Trilliums have been and gone, and reminded me as they dried out there’s a red underbelly, much as a green maple leaf also has a hidden color.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Our red trilliums are past but the painted are just getting started. Last year I planted a nodding and will probably have to wait another year for a flower. There is a big difference between here and the Pacific NW for sure. I thought I had shared the underside of a painted trillium but apparently not so I can’t link to it. Maybe I do that another day.

      Like

  15. bluebrightly says:

    That’s sad about the Lady’s slippers – I know you were hoping! I’m continuously struck when walking in the woods and along the bluffs, by the narrow ranges of certain plants. One area might look exactly the same as another and be only yards away but the Fawn lilies (for example) only want to grow in certain places. Same for many plants (gee, not dandelions!). It just shows us how much we don’t know, which can be reassuring. At least some of those precious $$ went to a good cause. Re the Trillium, a little damage can be beautiful, too, no?

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, disappointing but I can still hold out hope that the plant was recovering and took an hiatus for a year which lady’s slippers are known to do at times. I’ll be surprised if that is the case but something to wonder about for a year. Yeah, dandelions. Mary Beth and I agreed that they could stay for a week or two for bee food but now it’s off with their heads. 🙂 I’ll continue to contribute to the cause but probably not with lady’s slippers. Damage gives character, doesn’t it? 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s