01.19.2020 Bubbles and Needles

Yesterday did not fulfill the forecast for the temperature to reach zero…to a degree.  9° that is.

Related image

But 9° is more than cold enough for ice to form and this is one of a few things I found in the little stream that flows from the waterfall at Harvard Pond.

If you look closely you will see all sorts of shapes within each frozen bubble and in a few there are fine cracks.  I would have loved to pull out the 25mm macro but the ice was extremely delicate and I had to shoot with the 180 to maintain enough distance to not crack and destroy my subject.  And we just had a few inches of snow so it is covered now and with that insulation the “warmth” from the water has most likely melted it under the blanket. But there’ll be others.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Abstract, Central Massachusetts, Closeup Photography, Ice, Nature Photography, Patterns in Nature and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

28 Responses to 01.19.2020 Bubbles and Needles

  1. My first impression was a bunch of unusual coins spilled on the ground.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Andrew says:

    My first reaction was exactly the same as Steve’s – silver coins. Nice composition.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Nice Steve! I think of bubbles frozen in time!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Lemony says:

    I love these kinds of bubble clusters with needles mixed in. The fine lines and various “designs” within the bubbles are fascinating, as are the ways in which the bubbles gather. It’s funny, I could have used a similar title for my own image today. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Lemony. Yes, we were of similar compositional minds today. I often try to find images with just the bubbles but other times the addition of needles or tiny bits of leaves do add a little something that completes the picture.

      Like

  5. bluebrightly says:

    You’re becoming an ice expert….and they are like whole worlds….the needles are a good contrast/context.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thank you, Lynn. They are like tiny world’s or sometimes even little galaxies. How they don’t just freeze but do so slowly enough to capture some of the air in the water creating different designs is mesmerizing. Just like snow flakes, each one unique.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Ann Mackay says:

    I love the markings within the ice. It must have been very cold indeed for the bubbles to freeze quickly. I’m enjoying these ice pictures – looking forward to more… 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • I’ve captured them before without really concentrating on the patterns. This time I noticed and paid closer attention. It was fairly cold, 9°F, but not as cold as I had hoped. It’s interesting how the air bubbles can freeze in such distinct patterns. I am sure physics could explain that but it also falls into the random associations of chaos phenomenon. Thanks, Ann. There will be more. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  7. I’m seeing the lenses from eyeglasses. It’s a cool pattern with the dark background and needles.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I would have this as an abstract, any day.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Eliza Waters says:

    Well spotted, Steve. Sweet image. Now with the latest snow, it is a whole new world to explore. Stay warm through this next cold spell!

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Eliza. It’s a week later, thank to WP spamming you, so the world was a new sight and now it’s melting. Should be snow today but I know you aren’t sorry that it’s warm. 🙂

      Like

      • Eliza Waters says:

        Glad I was rescued from spam. 🙂 WP spam has been weird for me lately, too.
        The unseasonably mild weather is a bit troubling, particularly as we pass the dormancy requirements for most plants. A hard frost following bud break is a worry that unfortunately happens more often than it used to.

        Liked by 1 person

      • The box for emailing notification was unchecked. I don’t know how that happens because I had unchecked it twice in the past month and then again today. The WP experts have no answer except clean your browser which I already do regularly. Anyway, how you got in spam is a mystery but that is now one of my regular checks as well.
        That happens to our wisteria almost every year. It’s not flowered for a while with this crazy weather that apparently is a regular thing. I don’t know if it’s connected but our peonies, both tree and herbaceous, hardly flowered at all last year.

        Like

      • Eliza Waters says:

        If your wisteria buds get a light frost, you can sprinkle them with water before sunrise and it will melt the ice slowly, minimizing the cellular damage. Orange orchards in FL use this and seem encased in ice, but it works.
        Peonies love a good dose of lime every year or so, plus I use Plantone for fertilizer. Are they in full sun? Flowering is reduced in part-shade. Hope that helps!

        Liked by 1 person

      • Thanks, Eliza.Our peonies are all in full sun. I think Mary Beth uses Plantone. I know that we use Hollytone for our blueberries,azaleas and rhodies. This was our first bad year. They all usually are quite prolific. We’ll try Plantone if we haven’t been using it and hope for a better year.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Eliza Waters says:

        Don’t forget the lime, as our soil tends towards acidic, which peonies (as well as German iris and lilacs) don’t like, pH 6-7 is ideal.

        Liked by 1 person

      • We add lime to the lilacs so will be sure to include the peonies. I have a soil tester so will be sure first. Thanks again. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

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