11.23.2019-2 Sweetness

Back to sharing images.Β  πŸ™‚

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Animal Behavior, Nature Photography, Quabbin and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

33 Responses to 11.23.2019-2 Sweetness

  1. This seems to be the first deer picture you’ve ever posted here.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. shoreacres says:

    Look at those eyelashes! And those whiskers. What a great portrait.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I don’t know the gender, but with eye lashes like that and those eyes, well it’s easy to assume “she”. The eyelashes and whiskers are attractive but it’s the ear hair, which I have of my own, that’s got my attention. πŸ™‚ Thanks, Linda.

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      • shoreacres says:

        The mention of ear hair made me laugh. My preferred varnish brushes are made by Elder & Jenks, and they include ox ear hair. They’re also pretty pricey, as you might imagine. I noticed that they aren’t publishing their price list on their site these days. I’m not sure who harvests the hair, or how, but I hope they get a good cut of the profits.

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      • Ha, ha. Yeah, those folks definitely should get hazardous duty pay. Maybe they distract them with a nice big bag of oats. I hadn’t heard of ox hair brushes but my favorites for shellac and varnish are skunk and/or badger, neither of which I’d want to coax for their fur.

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      • shoreacres says:

        I use badger on a daily basis. The ox-ear gets saved for the last couple of coats. When I start from bare wood, there usually are ten coats brushed on, so there’s plenty of chance to use both.

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      • I don’t actually do much brushing any more unless someone gives me an antique to repair/refinish. Most retail finishes now are fully sprayed with no rubbing. So I mostly spray which is not in a spray booth, we’ve never had one, and is done with aerosol cans. My little exhaust fan couldn’t deal with compressed spraying. It’s not perfect but I generally get results equal to the original factory finish which is what’s required. When I had my shop the skunk/badger brushes really laid down a nice even smooth bubble-free layer.

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  3. Todd Henson says:

    Sweetness, indeed! And one thing I like about this image is what appears to be a lack of ticks. Down here this beauty might have them all over its ears.

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    • We have plenty of ticks here also, but she was lucky to not have any at this point. The location where I shot this is in Quabbin Park’s orchard. Several other parts of the reservoir’s watershed are open to hunting and there is talk now of including a limited hunt in the park also to control the population which, of course, would also reduce the tick population as well. Whether that occurs remains to be seen.

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  4. Sweetness indeed. Doeful eyes.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. melissabluefineart says:

    Aw. I’d assume female as well since there are no antlers, which at this time of year I believe the males all have. I’d like deer a lot more if people didn’t feed them, thus increasing their fecundity beyond sustainable limits.

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    • This is not a recent image although it was made in November. Male yearlings don’t grow antlers until the following Spring. But they do have pedicels or little bumps so this might indeed be a female. Most wild critters can find food and don’t need us to provide for them. Winter birds get accustomed to feeders and they are mostly for our entertainment rather than birds’ neediness.

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  6. I want one, too, Steve. πŸ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  7. bluebrightly says:

    Every last little hair and whisker and eyelash – and the texture on the nose – that’s what I love the most. Wonderful, Steve.

    Liked by 1 person

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