10.21.2019 Another roadside attraction

For a while now, I’ve been making images of places I often pass by thinking they’d make a good photograph but hadn’t previously done so. Yesterday was another. This little pond, whose name if it has one I have yet to discover, is right by Amherst Road in Pelham just after one turns off of Route 202.  That is one of the three main roads I travel on the way home from North Quabbin. I am sure hundreds of cars pass here daily on the way to and from Amherst, especially college students returning from points east.

It’s easy to miss this as you have to be looking for it through the trees at the edge of the road. I think it was even nicer before our Wednesday rain event, but there is still enough color to appreciate and a reflection to boot.

I’ve adopted the title of a Tom Robbins novel from the 90’s for this category of photographs.

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Autumn Color, Fall Foliage, Landscape, Nature Photography, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

19 Responses to 10.21.2019 Another roadside attraction

  1. Gallivanta says:

    A beautiful scene. It looks as though the fall colours are well advanced.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. It looks a little swampy and unkempt compared to the other places you normally show us, but it’s still good.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Possibly. I think most of the others not in Quabbin Park would be a little unkempt. I watch some videos from photographers in Great Britain and a lot of their forests belong to trusts who care for the land. Quabbin Forests are managed but for water control and not for any aesthetic consideration.

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  3. Mike Powell says:

    What a wonderful shot, Stephen. I grew up in Massachusetts and the fall colors here in Northern Virginia do not measure up to those of New England. I had to Google Pelham to see where exactly it was located. I am not familiar with Rt 202, but am quite familiar with Route 2, a bit further to the north. (I went to a prep school in Northfield and to college in Williamstown, both off of Route 2.)

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Mike.
      Northfield-Mount Herman and Williams?

      Folks returning to UMass among other destinations coming from Boston on Route 2 would get off in Orange and pick up 202 down to Amherst Road and on into Amherst. We the reverse up[ to 2 when going to Maine. Much faster, surprisingly, than taking the Turnpike to Worcester.

      I’ve never been to Virginia during Autumn and only a couple of times when wandering away from my sister-in-law’s in Bethesda. We have a lot of maples here which makes a big difference.

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      • Mike Powell says:

        Yeah, Northfield Mt Hermon and Williams. (NMH initially was two schools–a boys school and a girls school–but they were joined to form NMH my senior year).

        Liked by 1 person

      • I tried to do a quick research on the school’s current status. I know they closed the old campus and, I thought, shuttered the school. But I missed the part about consolidation.

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      • Mike Powell says:

        It’s a little bit more complicated than that. Northfield was the girls school and Mount Hermon was the boys school, both founded by evangelist Dwight L. Moody. In 1971 they merged into a single school with two campuses, both of which were co-ed. In 2005 they consolidated onto the former Mount Hermon campus and closed most of the former Northfield campus. I think that’s where things stand now.

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      • After I posted this I found some more information, including the Hobby Lobby involvement which doesn’t seem to have worked out.

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  4. bluebrightly says:

    Perfect title for the series, and isn’t it nice to find these little ponds tucked away behind the trees…your photo has that quiet air of a comfortable, even snug place of contemplation.

    Liked by 1 person

    • When I am photographing a place like this I try to give it its own world. Literally feet behind me were cars whizzing by. Same with a couple of my other recent pond/foliage shots. I guess it’s the same when folks photograph little natural areas in an urban environment.
      Actually, to avoid the overhanging trees I had to carefully clamber down a steepish slope almost to water’s edge. Slippery leaves and all. But, as I am sure you experience, once we start the exposures the rest of the world fades away. 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Pete Hillman says:

    Your autumn colours are amazing there Steve!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. susurrus says:

    Lovely colours and movement in the trees.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. shoreacres says:

    There’s so much to enjoy here: the curve of the treeline, the marbled clouds, the reflection that proves there’s some blue sky up there, above the clouds. If a formal English garden is on one end of some spectrum, this might be at the other end, and this is where I’d love to settle in for a time. It’s clearly a place that could be explored for hours, if not days — even with the cars around.

    Liked by 1 person

    • There are so many little spots like this one around here. Many are used as fire ponds but this one doesn’t seem to be one. Just a nice little water hole . It has a brook running into and out of it and possibly the road is what backs up the water and created the pond.
      The tag doesn’t include “HDR” as many often do, but it is a challenging dynamic range that required two exposures to see the shadows and highlights as my eyes did.

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