10.16.2019 Almost Wordless Wednesday-Two from a ride around Quabbin Park

A view of the reservoir from the Spillway

A favorite Maple

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Autumn Color, Fall Foliage, Intimate Landscape, Landscape, Nature Photography, Quabbin, Western Massachusetts and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

25 Responses to 10.16.2019 Almost Wordless Wednesday-Two from a ride around Quabbin Park

  1. shoreacres says:

    The little red bush in the first photo stands out, but I like the layered look of the rocks at the shoreline, too. That lush maple reminds me of another tree you’ve photographed that I really liked — one that stands up on a hill somewhere. I can’t remember the location, but I certainly remember the tree, and that it looked as much like a painting as a photograph. The remaining bits of green on the maple make the image shine for me: they’re a hint of the process at work.

    Liked by 1 person

    • You got me stumped on the image you remember. As we have discussed before, the addition of a little green, actually more that some is remaining, adds to a foliage photograph. I was glad to see a bit although the amount of yellow/gold I found quite pleasing and really liked the way the tree spreads across the image.
      I am pretty sure the rock’s condition is the result of blasting to create the spillway, probably worn smooth from 80 or so years of water coursing through there. I’ve shot this once before and really like the composition. Might do it again some day.

      Liked by 1 person

      • shoreacres says:

        I tried using Google’s advanced search feature, but haven’t come up with just the right combination of terms. I’ll think on it. I know the tree was on top of a hill, and it was during a period when you were posting more images of the Quabbin tower, so I ought to be able to find it. Wish I could transfer the vibrant image in my mind to the page — that would make it much easier.

        Liked by 1 person

      • shoreacres says:

        DingDingDing! We have a winner! I found it. And when I looked in the comments, sure enough: it reminded me of the Hudson School. It was the second photo in this post.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Nice sleuthing, Linda. The large tree is now gone, sadly. It was damaged enough by the rot that for safety’s sake the town had to take it down. So now the staked tree is on its own. There are several candidates for a small tree to remind you of the one from this current post. Thanks for your digging…and for liking my images enough to remember them. 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  2. In the first picture, the eroded-from-below rocks look like the shells of clams or similar creatures. In the second picture, you’ve recorded a hefty and almost monochrome dose of yellow.

    Liked by 1 person

    • I hadn’t seen the rock as clam shells but it’s a good thought. I tried a few views and different distances before settling on the one I posted. If I get back again before the leaves are gone, we had quite a storm last night with strong wind and heavy rain,I might try one lying on my back below.

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  3. melissabluefineart says:

    The reservoir shot is just so lovely. I like it all~the layering of land and water, the layering of the rock, the layering of the vegetation…clearly I’m thinking in layers today. Must be the cold wind blowing that is putting that in my mind. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • Yes, dress warmly, Melissa. 🙂
      I’ve become quite fond of this view. It is actually behind a restraint fence, black iron posts, and I have to fit my tripod legs between the fence posts in order to get this angle. It also keeps me from falling in.

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      • melissabluefineart says:

        Ah, that is interesting. Your photo makes it look like you can just walk in there, and I’ve wondered how it stays so pristine.
        Sigh…yes, I’ve got my parka out for taking my little dog for walks now. And shoes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I am glad that the fence is there…it’s a bit of drop to the water. The season is coming fast upon us. We have been having evening fires in the woodstove regularly for about a week now.

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      • melissabluefineart says:

        Yeah we turned our furnace on. We keep it low and it only runs once in awhile so far. I hope they are wrong, about the brutal winter coming.

        Liked by 1 person

      • I just saw a report that the coming winter may be warmer than usual. That’s not a great shock.

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      • melissabluefineart says:

        I just saw that, too! Here’s hoping…

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      • Well, for human comfort, I agree. But as a photographer of water in motion I always hope for a good deep snow pack so the water will run deep into the summer before turning into a stony dribble. So maybe not frigid but hopefully cold enough to maintain what snow we do receive which the last few years hasn’t been a lot.

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      • melissabluefineart says:

        I know, I know. Even as I typed it I was scolding myself for my selfish attitude toward winter.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Same here. If we didn’t have enough snow it’d disappoint all the skiers too.

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      • melissabluefineart says:

        When we don’t get snow we don’t get yahoos on snowmobiles ripping through yards and forest preserves 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  4. melissabluefineart says:

    And the tree~ those yellow maples really glow, don’t they/

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Wonderful shots. Maples are my favorites in the fall. And oaks, OK, aspens and sumac, too. Well, sassafras, burning bush, witch hazel, too. But maples rule

    Liked by 1 person

    • Glad that you are able to narrow down your favorites, Robert. 🙂

      All of the species have their own beauty. Burning bush is a love hate situation. They are not native and considered invasive. We inherited one in our yard and have tried to keep it under control. It got quite out of hand over the last few years and I had to trim it with a chain saw. I am not a good silviculture barber but it’ll recover. I like oaks because some keep their leaves through the winter as do beeches whose leaves become bright white when the sun hits them in a woods with no other leafed trees.

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  6. Thom Hickey says:

    Wonderful colours and textures.

    Regards Thom

    Liked by 1 person

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