01.20.2019 One more from yesterday’s Orchard Trail visit

 

About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Closeup Photography, Ice, Nature Photography, Quabbin and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

24 Responses to 01.20.2019 One more from yesterday’s Orchard Trail visit

  1. What great curves you’ve caught.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Lemony says:

    Beautifully composed. I love the deep, rich tones in the background. There is an interesting “mirroring-effect” of the edges of the leaf in the ice, and the lines in the ice are particularly wonderful.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Todd Henson says:

    Such fascinating patterns. And I like the 3 holes (of sorts), in the leave and on either side of it in the ice.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. shoreacres says:

    I don’t think I’ve seen anything like this, at least in nature. Those sharp lines seem to have a bit of an industrial vibe to them. On the other hand, they also remind me of Art Deco patterns, particularly the kind used on movie marquees and buildings during that time.

    I wondered if the same force that made the hole in the leaf also made the hole in the ice next to it. They appear to be much the same size. Could something have punctured both, and then the leaf moved? As you say, there’s a lot to look at, and wonder about. Did you notice the baby bird on the right, with its open beak? I see the hole farthest right as its eye, and the big, open curve as its beak.

    Liked by 1 person

    • That’s the cool thing about ice. Although there are some things one sees repeatedly, there always is something new as well. Nature’s Chaos. I haven’t seen forms like these two I have just shared.
      The holes are quite similar. It is possible they happened together. I see a rooster crowing. 🙂

      Like

  5. bluebrightly says:

    Another very beautiful image! It’s hard not to think of car design, with those scalloped ridges, but leaving that aside, the framing is spot on, the detail in the ice and leaf, and the faintest suggestion of leaves in the dark background are superb. Sorry, I’m just agog at your ice photos.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Lynn. Glad that you enjoy them. Although the cold abuses my fingers (Raynaud’s Disease) I love working with it and finding unique images. We usually have these cold temperatures through January, but these days nothing is “usual”. February can be good also although generally not as cold. Softer ice as opposed the the sharp edges here.

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      • bluebrightly says:

        I keep forgetting where you are, but it’s western Mass., right? Not so different from Syracsue, where I spent elementary school years. Lots of snow back then, sometimes a January thaw, some frigid weather in February but I guess it wans’t as severe as January — but you’re right, all bets are off these days!

        Liked by 1 person

    • My father was from Syracuse, mother from Schenectady, and we lived as a family in Syracuse during my mid-elementary years. I remember some intense winter storms but, of course, I was 7-8 and when you are that small things seem very large. The winter before we moved to Western Massachusetts we had a snowstorm that buried all the cars on our street. It’s been a while since we’ve experienced anything quite that epic.

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      • bluebrightly says:

        Small world – maybe we were there at the same time. We were on the western edge of the city, just inside city limits, near Bellevue Country Club, if any of that means anything. You’re so right about snowstorms and their relative size – I remember walking down our driveway and looking up at the piles of snow above my head, at around the same age you’re talking about, in the 50’s. Then there were too many times when I lived in and around NYC that snowplows would bury the car (parked on the street) and it had to be shoveled out – way too many times. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      • Pretty sure we lived in Syracuse @1955-57. We moved a lot in the 50’s. My father was a salesman for White Stag outdoor apparel and covered all of NT and New England. I am not surprised to hear that about NYC. Nowhere to put the snow until later when they dumped it in the East River or in the Ocean. Around here we have parking bans. That would be difficult in a major city.

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      • We lived on Livingston Street or Avenue, I don’t remember which and don’t remember a country club at all.

        Liked by 1 person

      • bluebrightly says:

        You were there for much less time than I was, but the same years. 🙂 I checked a map – Livingston is near Syracuse University, we were a bit west of that. We could sled down the 9th hole in winter. Back then the woods behind the house went on “forever” and there were trilliums. Just up the road new houses were being built and on weekends we played in the framed houses, great playgrounds for the imagination. I remember White Stag from when I was a teen – it was a desired brand. 🙂 The saleman’s life is tough though, and I bet all the moves were hard on everyone.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Very nice! A dynamic looking image!

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Absolutely fantastic. And I had the same immediate thought as Linda and Lynn, Art Deco auto design.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Wonderful lines, layers and I love the rusty colored leaf in the midst of it.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. tomwhelan says:

    Pretty ice patterns, with the leaf in a great spot in the frame. Hope you got out for the really cold mornings earlier in the week – there was some interesting ice.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Thanks, Tom.

      Unfortunately I did not. I don’t do well in the extreme cold right now and recovery is job one. Teens are not too bad but single digits and below with a wind chill not at this time. Something to look forward to.

      Like

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