09.27.2017 Defying imagination

The insect world is beyond imagination.  Natural selection has created so many different species that I don’t think human artists could even approach duplicating the feat. And, although describing is beyond my intention in this post, their lives are just as varied with strategies beyond anything we might dream up.

The White-marked Tussock Moth caterpillar (Orgyia leucostigma) that I found in Quabbin Park on August 26th is quite an example.This is one of the few cases where I posed an insect.  It was crawling on my camera bag and had to be removed so I could leave.  Naturally I placed it on a leaf and photographed. this cutie.Ain’t Nature grand?  🙂

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About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Insects, Lepidoptera, macro photography, Moths, Nature Photography, Quabbin and tagged , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

12 Responses to 09.27.2017 Defying imagination

  1. I like the caterpillar’s sinuous stance in the second picture.

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  2. This is one jazzy creature! Beautiful.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Ain’t it though? He looks like he’s all dressed up for the dance.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Todd Henson says:

    Oh, wow! Now that is one amazing looking creature. Never seen anything like it. Nature never ceases to amaze me, and I doubt that will ever change. Great find, and nice job capturing it!

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  5. Gallivanta says:

    Dressed to the Nines, and off to be a beautiful star at the Ugly Bug Ball. https://youtu.be/utWrIWq2_tk

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  6. shoreacres says:

    There are so many details to love. That red head, coordinated with the red spots on the body, is just one. I’m sure I’ve seen something like this in the past, and walked right past it, categorizing it as “fuzzy caterpillar” without giving it a second thought. Today, I’d stop for a photo session, too.

    Your comment about the variety around us really resonates. For most of my life a ladybug was a ladybug, until I found out some have seven spots and some have only two. Then, I found some on a millkweed that had no spots at all. Lo and behold, they’re part of the family, too.

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  7. Very pretty moth and a great close-up. Lucky find on your equipment. You can call it staged -it does not matter. You could not carry it home out of its habitat.

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