07.11.2016 Canada Lily big and small

Yesterday brought us some much needed rain.  Not a lot, but anything is appreciated and we did get intermittent showers.  I had thought about going to Hawley Bog as mentioned yesterday but the threat of rain made me think of today instead.  In the end I decided to go in the rain as I have to take my car in for service this morning and it is a 50 minute ride each way to Hawley. The pitcher plants were mostly on my mind, but I was happy to find this Canada Lily (Lilium canadense) along side the boardwalk.

Canada-Lilies-in-rain-071016-1024Being restricted to the boardwalk limits the compositional possibilities.  In this case I could not back up so shot with a 24-70 lens.  But I also could not get as close as I would have liked for the water drops.

Canada-Lily-with-rain-drops-071016-960I am happy enough with this image, but would have loved to get parallel to the curved stem and have all the drops in a nice row and sharp as a tack. Instead I focused on the one drop that shows an entire flower and let the others fall into a supporting role.  In hindsight, I think this works better without so much to draw your attention. I am also glad that I went on a rainy day for something a bit different.

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About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Abstract, Closeup Photography, Flora, Nature Photography, Patterns in Nature, The Nature Conservancy, Western Massachusetts, wildflower portrait, Wildflowers and tagged , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

22 Responses to 07.11.2016 Canada Lily big and small

  1. Beautywhizz says:

    The droplets look fantastic and what a beautiful lily.

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jim Ruebush says:

    This image focused on the drop and the large lily is exceptional. Great job.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. At a couple of places in Illinois last month I was constrained to boardwalks, so I sympathize with you. Nevertheless, that one drop showing the entire flower is worth it all.

    This is another instance where we’ve photographed the same species, but only because I did so in Massachusetts four years ago:

    https://portraitsofwildflowers.wordpress.com/2012/07/19/guest-post-7-canada-lilies/

    Like

  4. I’m almost glad you had constraints to work against~just look at the results you got!

    Liked by 1 person

    • It would have been nice to have more options, Melissa. I know where there are quite a few more a little closer to home and, hopefully, will be able to visit them this weekend. No boardwalk to contend with…just poison ivy.

      Like

  5. Jackson says:

    That close-up is really stunning, Steve! I think the narrow DOF on the droplets works just fine.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Wonderful contrast between the group and the close-up. The reflections in the droplets are amazing.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. shoreacres says:

    I don’t know about Texas, but I met a Mississippi gardener on July 4 who has these in her garden. She calls them yellow-bells, and when I looked them up, I did see that the color can range from yellow to orange to red.

    When I looked at the second photo, it brought to mind Blake’s words:

    “To see a World in a Grain of Sand
    And a Heaven in a Wild Flower,
    Hold Infinity in the palm of your hand
    And Eternity in an hour…”

    Here, of course, you’ve offered up a flower’s world in a drop of water. I can imagine it as a gazing ball, or a crystal paperweight with the flower inside. It’s a show-stopper, for sure.

    Liked by 1 person

    • We have yellow Canada Lilies here as well.

      t is true that one’s perception of the world is based on the perspective taken. Our size limits our immediate appreciation of what surrounds us, but as we get closer, or farther, that view changes and more or less is revealed of the wonder that is life. All one has to do is spend a few minutes studying a tide pool, roll over a log in the woods or watch a flower to see what is missed by most.

      Thanks, Linda.

      Like

  8. Photo (one) is striking- such a beautiful flower. You were lucky to get these shots.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. maybrick2001 says:

    I love the reflections in the rain drops. That takes a real steady hand:)

    Liked by 1 person

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