06.07.2016 A brook runs through it

One of the rewarding things about visiting familiar places is when you see things in a different way.  It’s true of many subjects including flowers and landscapes.  In this case it’s about the water.

I’ve photographed Atherton Brook inside of Gate 15 of the Quabbin Watershed on many occasions and several of those images have appeared here.  That is true of this scene also, but I had not taken in the curve aspect seen here.  Seems obvious, but one time I looked at the wider picture and another the closer.  I think I’ve hit a happy medium here.

Atherton-Brook-s-curve-060616-1075

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About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Landscape, Nature Photography, Patterns in Nature, Quabbin, Water, Western Massachusetts, Western Massachusetts Waterfalls and Cascades and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

8 Responses to 06.07.2016 A brook runs through it

  1. Ah, I like this view very much. These mossy rocks are gorgeous. Love this pic.

    Did the dog arrive yet?

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Jim Ruebush says:

    The S curve is very lush.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. shoreacres says:

    I especially like the places where it seems as though the water’s a veil. In the immediate foreground, it’s as though we can look through the water to the rock beneath. It’s a great effect that adds a little something extra to the curve of the brook.

    Like

    • Ah, my images must be getting to you, Linda. I can remember that, when I first started showing my longer exposure water falls, you preferred more the stop action images over the soft veiled ones. I am sure though that the circumstances control what one is looking for so both can work at different times. There is another waterfall that I have photographed where you can see through and behind the water to mossy surfaces that add some colorful interest to the falls.

      Like

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