07.05.2013 Katahdin Stream Falls

While I was in Millinocket, my friend Mark said I should hike up to this falls.  He has not been there and wanted me to check it out and get some shots.  Someone had posted an image of it on NatureScapes.net which was nice enough but had some small trees interfering with the view.  Well, it is hard to avoid them.  There really are only two vantage points.  In each case, there is a bit of a hazard just inches from your tripod’s front leg.

Here is the first view. Don’t forget to click for a larger image.Katahdin-Stream-Falls-060213-800FBThe tress aren’t terrible, but an unobstructed view is generally preferred.  A little below this spot is another location but it required scrambling down some slippery roots and rock…I’m not all that limber any more and tend to fall over easier than not that long ago.  At the edge of the short landing strip below is a big drop off into the gorge and stream.  But the view is different although the right side is cut off a bit more than I would like.  Still with the stray branches though.Katahdin-Stream-Falls-2-060213-800FBSo the answer is to get more intimate with the falls.Katahdin-Stream-Falls-upper-060213-1024FBIt was a somewhat strenuous hike for me with the kit on my back, climbing uphill over rocks and roots for about a mile.  Sure is encouragement to hit the gym.

One more…there was a nice view from a rocky outcrop while approaching the falls.Katahdin-Springs-Trail-2-060213-1024FBI’m not sure about the next post.  Maybe we’ll move on to Acadia.  It’s been a month and I don’t even remember what I did there.  Short term memory is on hiatus. 🙂

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About Steve Gingold

I am a Nature Photographer with interests in all things related. Water, flowers, insects and fungi are my main interests but I am happy to photograph wildlife and landscapes and all other of Nature's subjects.
This entry was posted in Maine, Nature Photography, Waterfalls and tagged , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

28 Responses to 07.05.2013 Katahdin Stream Falls

  1. Phil Lanoue says:

    Absolutely outstanding views Steve and I’m sure it was a struggle (it would be for me) but sure worth it since you came back with these terrific images!

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  2. Just Rod says:

    What a beautiful place and excellent photographs, but do be careful! I have been trying to figure out how my ND filter works (its a built in electronic one). May have to go back to the photography store and get some help.

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    • Thank you, Rod. Are you wondering about ND filter use in general or as it exists within your particular camera?

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      • Just Rod says:

        Hi Steve: probably both. I understand that be using the filter you can open the shutter longer while reducing the light entering the aperture, without reducing the aperture size. But when I try to use the internal ND filter on my Sony HX-200v the images still come out extremely overexposed. I should be able to use it with shutter priority setting or with programable automatic. I’ll try stopping by the photo store when I am in the city. The on-line guide is not very forthcoming. I’d love to photograph water flowing as you demonstrate so beautifully.

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      • Hi Rod, I would think going by the store should get you some help. That is a camera feature I have no knowledge of so I can’t help. I do use NDs and have several of different densities. But…I don’t use them often as I shoot in the early morning under fairly low light conditions and most times my circular polarizer is filter enough to get me some slow speeds. Sometimes I actually have to boost the ISO so there is detail maintained in the water. Early morning and dark forests make for some long exposures. 🙂

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      • Just Rod says:

        Thanks Steve. When I am in Mexico it is difficult to find low light in the places I am visiting. The boats don’t go until the sun is too high and leave in the afternoon. But I will keep that in mind for the lake country. Hopefully the store can help with the Sony. I will also try using the polarizing filter on the Olympus, hadn’t thought of using it that way.

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  3. I rather like the stray branches actually, especially in the first shot. Beautiful photos.

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  4. Andrew says:

    The intimate shot is a killer. The trees are a nuisance in some respects but part of the environment so have their place. It sounds a decidedly tricky place to photograph. Perhaps going with a partner would help. I doubt if you get mobile phone reception there, do you?

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    • Thnaks, Andrew. For a stiff jointed easily winded geezer like me it is a little challenging but once standing in position it is solid and enjoyable. The falls are loud enough that I was just barely aware when other hikers would pass by and no one came to see the falls. Most were on a deadline to make it to the top of Katahdin as there were storm warnings for early afternoon.
      A partner would be a good idea but there wasn’t anyone to accompany me…and I usually go alone. But, you are correct, there was no cell signal and I have yet to purchase the Spot http://www.rei.com/product/816133/spot-connect-satellite-communicator.

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  5. These are really gorgeous especially the close up of the falls. I hope that if you return that you go next time with a buddy just to be on the safe side.

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    • Thanks, Yvonne. I am used to going on my hikes alone both home and away. My friend has several physical ailments and is unable to do much walking. Next time I will see if I can hook up with someone.

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  6. Lottie Nevin says:

    Crikey, it sounds like you risked life and limb to get these dreamy waterfall shots. They are all marvellous but the intimate one is definitely the winner for me. It’s almost ethereal. I agree with Andrew, the trees though a nuisance to photograph around, are part of the landscape, they also make a nice frame and put it all into perspective. Great pictures Steve and well worth the hard slog to get them 🙂

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    • Thank you, Lottie….I love the word “Crikey”. 🙂 For me it was a little risky since I fall so much easier than I used to, not to mention increased gasping for breathe and leg fatigue, but most hikers would guffaw at my complaints. 🙂 It is a lovely spot but there are many great things to see at this park and I am not sure there will be a repeat hike.

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  7. You did a wonderful job from this nice place, Steve. Worth the effort! 😉

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  8. sschaenzerwp says:

    Absolutely gorgeous falls – what a fantastic photographer’s playground! My favourite is the intimate shot – just a fantastic flow.

    BTW, I’m always the last to comment – must be for the same reason why I’m processing my pics so slowly 8) 😉

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  9. …”Hit the gym” or maybe more enjoyable, hit the trail more often…? To me, this is what landscape photography is about. My father nearly always hiked into places where few others would go. My neighbor Carr Clifton is the same. I come from a long line of scrappers for nature photos. Recently I photographed with a very cool photographer friend, but his method is more the gentleman’s photography. He won’t photograph in the hot sun, only certain times of day, etc. At the same time he said he wanted to do landscape photography full-time. I wanted to say, “Well, you’ll have to change your whole approach,” but I couldn’t say that because his images are excellent as they are. Speaking of which, you have made some great images as usual, but these are some of your better waterfall photos in my opinion. I like the last waterfall best, but if you could just get a little less of the tree, the second one might be the most unique in waterfall images.

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    • Thanks, David. I have been trying to get more hikes in. A post or two from those hikes is in the works. I am under the impression that Carr still shoots in large format and, if so, must be in excellent fit for the hikes. I am always impressed reading about some of the climbs etc. the old time photographers (certainly that includes your father) undertook for their images. I don’t think Edward Weston was one of those…500 feet from the car or whatever distance he wrote. Anyway, I much prefer the pack on my back and a good hike over the gym. It does get easier with frequency.
      I think that even Galen Rowell would have a difficult time getting to a spot without tree interference here. For the second image there is a drop about two feet from my position next to a tree hugging the edge. One would need to walk the stream itself for quite a distance to get inside the gorge for that shot.

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  10. Some images just aren’t worth the scramble, but sometimes the scramble is part of the fun of making outdoor photographs, wouldn’t you say? Both Weston and Ansel Adams photographed mainly from close to the car when they got a little older. Ansel earned his stripes as an outdoorsman in his youth with rock climbing and scrambling all over the Sierra. Weston was not strictly a nature photographer anyway, but he gets a free pass to car photograph all he wants because he raised his own chickens and vegetable garden, living a simple life close to the land in many other ways. My dad, pioneer landscape photographer Philip Hyde, modeled some of his own lifestyle on Weston’s. Car photographing is OK, as long as true nature photographers also get deep into nature once in a while. I do a lot of car photography lately, mainly because of so many other obligations… to work related to photography. In fact, I was going to say in my last comment that continuing to photograph and hike as you get older is to be commended over anything else.

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    • I drive a minivan and it comes in handy for car photography in the rain when you can set up under the rear hatch.
      It is my goal to still do photographic hiking into my 80’s although what is considered a good hike changes with age. 🙂 Fortunately, I like to photograph insects and flowers which we have in abundance in the yard so no hike necessary there. But I do think a good walk with a kit on your back helps us age with a little remaining vigor.

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  11. Hi Steve
    Sorry I missed this, but this is a great post. Great imagery. Really illustrates the importance of persistence. I certainly agree that the intimate image is powerful, but I also like the second one as well, sort of an environmental portrait. Both to me tell the story. Great work.
    James

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